A new sign welcoming people to the City of Soldotna is photographed on May 1, 2019, in Soldotna, Alaska. (Photo by Brian Mazurek/Peninsula Clarion)

A new sign welcoming people to the City of Soldotna is photographed on May 1, 2019, in Soldotna, Alaska. (Photo by Brian Mazurek/Peninsula Clarion)

Soldotna receives funds for park, airport upgrades

The project includes the construction of an American Disabilities Act compliant trail

Soldotna was awarded a grant for $550,000 to improve accessibility and pedestrian pathways throughout the city’s downtown and Soldotna Creek Park.

The project includes the construction of an American Disabilities Act compliant trail from Soldotna Creek Park to Homestead Lane, a sidewalk leading to the Soldotna Creek footbridge and paving of the park’s nearly 2,300 feet of gravel trails.

The grant was awarded by the Department of Transportation, according to Soldotna City Manager Stephanie Queen.

“The grant awards federal monies through the State of Alaska DOT, for the purpose of improving access to City amenities for those experiencing disabilities, and to provide non-motorized connections between community assets,” Queen wrote in a memo to the Soldotna City Council.

The project requires a 20% match from the city.

“I appreciate John Czarnezki’s quick action to identify this funding source, and work with Parks and Rec., our Streets and Public Works Department, to put together a competitive project proposal, which will greatly enhance our park and downtown,” Queen wrote.

The city also received about $7 million in supplemental funding for the rehabilitation of the Soldotna Airport runway.

The airport will receive the funds for a runway profile modification, which will improve safety along the runway, according to Queen.

“In addition to re-grading the runway to take out a vertical curve (which will improve sight distance down the runway), the project will install new lighting and all new pavement, which will significantly reduce the city’s maintenance efforts related to crack sealing and other asphalt preservation,” Queen wrote.

The funding from the United States Department of Transportation does not require any local match from the city.

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