FILE - In this Sept. 23, 2013, file photo, a driver passes a small boat harbor in King Cove, Alaska. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke signed a land exchange agreement Monday, Jan. 22, 2018, authorizing a swap of federal land in Izembek National Wildlife Refuge for land owned by King Cove Corporation that could lead to a road through the refuge so King Cove residents can have land access to an all-weather airport at Cold Bay, Alaska. (James Brooks/Kodiak Daily Mirror via AP, File)

FILE - In this Sept. 23, 2013, file photo, a driver passes a small boat harbor in King Cove, Alaska. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke signed a land exchange agreement Monday, Jan. 22, 2018, authorizing a swap of federal land in Izembek National Wildlife Refuge for land owned by King Cove Corporation that could lead to a road through the refuge so King Cove residents can have land access to an all-weather airport at Cold Bay, Alaska. (James Brooks/Kodiak Daily Mirror via AP, File)

U.S. approves land exchange for road through Alaska refuge

  • By Dan Joling
  • Monday, January 22, 2018 11:18pm
  • News

ANCHORAGE — Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke signed a land trade agreement Monday that could lead to construction of a road through a national wildlife refuge in Alaska, portraying the exchange as a people-versus-wildlife issue.

Environmental groups have said they will fight to keep a road out of Izembek National Wildlife Refuge and its internationally recognized habitat for migrating waterfowl.

Surrounded by Alaska officials in Washington, D.C., Zinke signed the agreement swapping up to 0.8 square miles of federal refuge for lands of equal value owned by King Cove Native Corp.

King Cove, a fishing community of about 900 people sandwiched between ocean and mountains, wants the road for land access to an all-weather airport at the community of Cold Bay.

King Cove, Cold Bay and the Izembek refuge are near the tip of the Alaska Peninsula, the body of land in Alaska’s southwest corner that juts toward the Aleutian Islands.

Strong winds and the challenging King Cove area landscape frequently prompt flight cancellations. Residents for decades have sought a road link to Cold Bay, the site of an airport built during World War II that features one of Alaska’s longest runways.

“It’s more than just a road,” Zinke said at the signing event. “It’s an idea and value that people really do matter.”

Zinke said the 12-mile section of the road through the refuge would cause no harm to wildlife but would make a difference to children or mothers who need to get to a hospital. He said the road is a priority for President Donald Trump.

“The president want to make sure the people’s voice is heard,” he said

Supporters say a one-lane, gravel road would carry medical patients and private traffic but would be closed to commercial uses such as transporting fish.

Congress in 1997 addressed the King Cove transportation issue with a $37.5 million appropriation for water access to Cold Bay that included a $9 million hovercraft. The Aleutians East Borough, the regional governing body, took the vessel out of service after deciding it was too expensive and unreliable to operate.

A road would split an isthmus as narrow as 3 miles wide. The isthmus is the southern border of the 150-square-mile Izembek Lagoon, holding one of the world’s largest beds of eelgrass, a rich food source for Pacific brant geese, endangered Steller’s eider sea ducks and other migratory birds.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 2013 concluded that a road through the isthmus could cause irrevocable damage to the watershed. Former Interior Secretary Sally Jewell agreed with a Fish and Wildlife analysis that found a land exchange could not compensate for the special qualities of existing wildlife refuge lands.

“You can’t make a fair trade for this kind of wilderness, because there’s nothing else like it,” said Randi Spivak, public lands program director at the Center for Biological Diversity, in a statement. “This land swap violates the purpose of the refuge. It will devastate wildlife and destroy congressionally designated wilderness.”

Spivak said King Cove residents have other, safer options for emergency flights.

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, center, speaks during an event in the office of Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, second from right, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, Jan. 22, 2018. Zinke was joined by Alaskan officials regarding the Interior Department’s decision to the construction of a road through a national wildlife refuge in Alaska.The road would connect the communities of King Cove and Cold Bay, which has an all-weather airport needed for emergency medical flights. Alaska Gov. Bill Walker listens at right. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, center, speaks during an event in the office of Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, second from right, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, Jan. 22, 2018. Zinke was joined by Alaskan officials regarding the Interior Department’s decision to the construction of a road through a national wildlife refuge in Alaska.The road would connect the communities of King Cove and Cold Bay, which has an all-weather airport needed for emergency medical flights. Alaska Gov. Bill Walker listens at right. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, center, talks with Alaska Gov. Bill Walker, right, following an event in her office on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, Jan. 22, 2018. Murkowski was joined by other Alaskan officials regarding the Interior Department’s decision to the construction of a road through a national wildlife refuge in Alaska.The road would connect the communities of King Cove and Cold Bay, which has an all-weather airport needed for emergency medical flights. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, center, talks with Alaska Gov. Bill Walker, right, following an event in her office on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, Jan. 22, 2018. Murkowski was joined by other Alaskan officials regarding the Interior Department’s decision to the construction of a road through a national wildlife refuge in Alaska.The road would connect the communities of King Cove and Cold Bay, which has an all-weather airport needed for emergency medical flights. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, right, listens as Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, right, speaks during an event in her office on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, Jan. 22, 2018. Murkowski was joined by other Alaskan officials regarding the Interior Department’s decision to the construction of a road through a national wildlife refuge in Alaska. The road would connect the communities of King Cove and Cold Bay, which has an all-weather airport needed for emergency medical flights. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, right, listens as Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, right, speaks during an event in her office on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, Jan. 22, 2018. Murkowski was joined by other Alaskan officials regarding the Interior Department’s decision to the construction of a road through a national wildlife refuge in Alaska. The road would connect the communities of King Cove and Cold Bay, which has an all-weather airport needed for emergency medical flights. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, holds up a copy of a news paper with a note from President Donald Trump during an event in her office on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, Jan. 22, 2018. Murkowski was joined by other Alaskan officials regarding the Interior Department’s decision to the construction of a road through a national wildlife refuge in Alaska.The road would connect the communities of King Cove and Cold Bay, which has an all-weather airport needed for emergency medical flights. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, holds up a copy of a news paper with a note from President Donald Trump during an event in her office on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, Jan. 22, 2018. Murkowski was joined by other Alaskan officials regarding the Interior Department’s decision to the construction of a road through a national wildlife refuge in Alaska.The road would connect the communities of King Cove and Cold Bay, which has an all-weather airport needed for emergency medical flights. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, left, talks with Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, right, before an event in her office on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, left, talks with Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, right, before an event in her office on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

More in News

Renewable IPP CEO Jenn Miller presents information about solar power during a meeting of the Kenai Peninsula Borough Assembly on Tuesday, Oct. 12, 2021 in Soldotna, Alaska. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
Company looks to build solar farm on peninsula

It would be roughly 20 times the size of the largest solar farm currently in the state.

(Image courtesy CDC)
Officials: COVID is at a plateau in Alaska

The approved COVID vaccines, Zink said, are the best tool to get cases to drop off.

Clem Tillion of Halibut Cove poses for a photo on Jan. 9, 2020, in Homer, Alaska. The veteran Alaska legislator was passing through Homer while waiting to take the M/V Tustumena ferry to Kodiak. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)
Clem Tillion, PFD founder and former legislator, dies at 96

Tillion died Wedneday, Oct. 13, at Halibut Cove home.

“Soctober” will take place from noon to 5 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 16, 2021, at the Cook Inlet Counseling parking lot at 10200 Kenai Spur Highway in Kenai, and consists of rock painting, the winter gear giveaway and a free spaghetti lunch. (Image via Cook Inlet Council on Alcohol and Drug Abuse)
Recovery group to host outreach event

The event will include rock painting, the winter gear giveaway and a free spaghetti lunch.

Finn Petersen, left, is announced the winner of a $49,000 Alaska 529 scholarship on Thursday, Oct. 14, 2021, as part of the “Give AK a Shot” COVID-19 vaccine program. (Photo via the Alaska Chamber of Commerce)
Anchorage residents win latest vaccine lottery

“Give AK a Shot” awards $49,000 in cash scholarships to one newly vaccinated adult and one child.

Jason Floyd testifies in opposition to COVID-19 mandates during a meeting of the Soldotna City Council on Wednesday, Oct. 13, 2021 in Soldotna, Alaska. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
Protesters pack council meeting, declare ‘medical liberty’

Attendance at Wednesday’s meeting was reduced to standing-room only.

Baked goods are on display during a Soldotna Chamber of Commerce pie auction in this undated photo. (Photo courtesy Soldotna Chamber of Commerce)
‘Local gourmets’ to share baking skills at Soldotna Pie Auction

The Great British Baking Show-esque event showcases local culinary talent.

A spruce bark beetle is seen on the underside of a piece of bark taken from logs stacked near Central Peninsula Landfill on Thursday, July 1, 2021 near Soldotna, Alaska. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
Chugach campgrounds to be closed for beetle kill mitigation

Only one campground will be closed at a time, and updates on closures will be shared to the Chugach National Forest’s website.

Most Read