Photo by Rashah McChesney/Peninsula Clarion  The Dena'ina Wellness Center in Old Town Kenai is in its final stages of construction Jan. 30, 2014 in Kenai, Alaska.  Several architectural additions to the building are reminiscint of Alaska Native staples including this one meant to look like a fish rack.

Photo by Rashah McChesney/Peninsula Clarion The Dena'ina Wellness Center in Old Town Kenai is in its final stages of construction Jan. 30, 2014 in Kenai, Alaska. Several architectural additions to the building are reminiscint of Alaska Native staples including this one meant to look like a fish rack.

New Dena’ina Wellness Center opens

  • By Rashah McChesney
  • Sunday, February 16, 2014 5:15pm
  • News

To take a walk around through Old-Town Kenai toward the new Dena’ina Wellness Center is to see time and geography slowly compressed into one building.

The concrete foundation, exposed conduit and steel frame construction has given way to 66,000 feet of 92-year-old cannery wood, beach grasses leading up to a rock and agate-edged central meeting place as bright colors give way to darker accents and colors reminiscent of mountains in the distance.

The 52,000-square-foot facility will provide primary care, dental and family services for about 5,000 patients, said Jaylene Peterson-Nyren, executive director of the Kenaitze Indian Tribe.

The new wellness center is scheduled to have its grand opening in June, though Peterson-Nyren said some services would be available before then.

The $36 million facility, located on Mission Avenue behind the tribe’s Tyotkas Elder Center, is expected to create 50 new jobs and bring in about $200 million in federal funds to the Kenai area in the next 20 years.

When the facility opens, Peterson said health practitioners will be pioneering an inclusive kind of medical treatment that will involve medical, dental, behavioral health specialists, chemical dependency, physical therapy, pharmacy and traditional healing services professionals will work in teams to treat each patient.

An Indian Health Service Joint Venture award, given in 2011, will pay to operate the health care facility.

The tribe agreed to design, construct and equip the building under its agreement with IHS, according to its website.

Thus far the tribe has received more than $10 million in federal appropriations to pay for staff and operations of the new facility during its first year and should be funded for a minimum of 20 years.

During its opening, Peterson-Nyren described the project with the Dena’ina word Naquantughedul, or “The tide has turned and we are truly coming back to ourselves, our culture and who we are.”

 

Reach Rashah McChesney at rashah.mcchensey@peninsulaclarion.com.

Photo by Rashah McChesney/Peninsula Clarion  Mike Gangloff works to clear paper off of the floor of a room he painted at the new Dena'ina Wellness Center Wednesday Jan. 29, 2014 in Kenai, Alaska.

Photo by Rashah McChesney/Peninsula Clarion Mike Gangloff works to clear paper off of the floor of a room he painted at the new Dena’ina Wellness Center Wednesday Jan. 29, 2014 in Kenai, Alaska.

Photo by Rashah McChesney/Peninsula Clarion  The new Den'aina Wellness Center building is designed to use a maximum amount of outside light in the building before artificial light is introduced.

Photo by Rashah McChesney/Peninsula Clarion The new Den’aina Wellness Center building is designed to use a maximum amount of outside light in the building before artificial light is introduced.

More in News

Kenai Finance Director Terry Eubank, left, and Kenai City Manager Paul Ostrander present during a budget work session on Saturday, May 14, 2022, in Kenai, Alaska. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
Flat mill rate, sales tax included in Kenai budget proposal

The budget proposal is subject to final approval by the Kenai City Council

t
Senate effectively kills restrictive transgender sports bill

Bipartisan group of senators votes to table controversial bill

Sen. Bert Stedman, R-Sitka, chair of the bicameral conference committee tasked with hammering out differences in the state’s budget bill, signs the committee report as members finished their work on Tuesday, May 17, 2022. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire
Committee compromises on PFD in budget plan

Members of the conference committee agreed Tuesday to a payment of about $3,800

Graduates laugh during teacher Jesse Bjorkman’s 2022 commencement address at Nikiski Middle/High School on Monday, May 16, 2022 in Nikiski, Alaska. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
Nikiski Middle/High School graduates 31 students

The commencement ceremony was held Monday in the school gym

Peter Segall / Juneau Empire
Members of the Alaska House of Representatives on Saturday rejected the budget bill passed by the Senate earlier in the week. The bill will now go to a bicameral committee for negotiations, but the end of the legislative session is Wednesday.
House votes down Senate’s budget as end of session nears

State budget now goes to negotiating committee

Peter Segall / Juneau Empire
Candidate for Alaska’s lone seat in the U.S. House of Representatives Tara Sweeney, a Republican, was in Juneau on Monday and sat down with the Empire for an interview. Sweeney said the three main pillars of her campaign are the economy, jobs and healthy communities.
Sweeney cites experience in run for Congress

GOP candidate touts her history of government-related work

One tree stands in front of the Kenai Post Office on Thursday, May 12, 2022, in Kenai, Alaska. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
Kenai taking down hazard beetle trees

The city hopes to leverage grant funds for most of the work

Former Alaska governor and current congressional hopeful Sarah Palin speaks with attendees at a meet-and-greet event outside of Ginger’s Restaurant on Saturday, May 14, 2022, in Soldotna, Alaska. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
Palin brings congressional bid to Soldotna

The former governor took time Saturday to sign autographs and take pictures with attendees

Most Read