LNG review board holds first meeting

  • By KAYLEE OSOWSKI
  • Thursday, August 7, 2014 9:28pm
  • News

Despite fears that their voices would not be heard, at least one borough mayor returned from the inaugural meeting of the Municipal Advisory Gas Project Review Board with more faith about the input local governments will have in the development process of a proposed gasline project.

Discussions at the two-day meeting of the new, governor-created board which seeks to review and understand the potential impacts the Alaska LNG Project LLC could have on local governments, has reassured Kenai Peninsula Borough Mayor Mike Navarre about the board’s role.

“I have a better comfort level,” he said. … “Obviously, we’re going to have to wait and see as things go along and what happens when legislation is actually introduced before the legislature, but at least I feel like we’ll have an opportunity to provide input into the process and certainly during our meetings of this board.”

The board is primarily made up of borough mayors throughout the state. The meeting was held in Anchorage Tuesday and Wednesday. Presentations were given about the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, oil and gas property tax and global liquefied natural gas markets among other topics.

“There was a lot of good information that was put out about global markets, what we’re competing with, the window of opportunity that comes and goes with major gas projects and which other ones are on the horizon around the world that are being considered,” Navarre said.

Navarre said the board discussed the studies that must be done when Alaska LNG Project sends its application to FERC, which, according to presentation documents, starts with pre-filing. Alaska LNG plans to do this year, according to documents. Pre-filing includes an environmental impact statement, and resource reports that cover air and noise quality; reliability and safety; cultural resources; fish, wildlife and vegetation and socioeconomic, among other reports.

“All of that was really interesting and gave me … complete comfort that the socioeconomic impacts will be considered and evaluated,” he said. “But it’s also important that local governments who will be impacted by it pay attention to what’s written in those studies and weigh in on it with information of their own of what they see as impact so that they can be included.”

One concern Navarre discussed in previous interviews with the Clarion is tax structuring and the impacts different options, such as a payment in lieu of taxes, would have on the borough.

He said the board didn’t debate tax structure at the meeting.

“We touched on it but didn’t really get into a lot of the details on it,” he said.

The board plans to try to meet monthly between now and December, he said.

Meeting documents and presentations are available on the Alaska Department of Revenue website: dor.alaska.gov/MunicipalAdvisoryGasProjectReviewBoard.aspx.

Kaylee Osowski can be reached at kaylee.osowski@peninsulaclarion.com

More in News

Kenai City Manager Paul Ostrander speaks at a ribbon-cutting ceremony at Kenai Municipal Airport on Friday, Aug. 6, 2021 in Kenai, Alaska. A kiosk that will offer educational programming and interpretive products about the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge is coming to the airport. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsua Clarion)
Wildlife refuge kiosk coming to airport

Kenai National Wildlife Refuge stickers, T-shirts, magnets, travel stamps and enamel pins will be available.

This illustration provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in January 2020 shows the 2019 Novel Coronavirus. (CDC)
5 more COVID deaths reported

The total nationwide fatalities surpass population of Alaska.

Velda Geller fills goodie bags at the Kenai Senior Center on Friday, Oct. 22, 2021 for next weekend’s drive-through trick-or-treat event. (Camille Botello/Peninsula Clarion)
‘This has been a lifesaver’

Seniors seek human connection as pandemic continues.

Kenai City Hall on Feb. 20, 2020, in Kenai, Alaska. (Photo by Victoria Petersen/Peninsula Clarion)
‘A very slippery slope that we need to be careful of’

Approval of library grant postponed after Kenai council requests to preview book purchases

This undated photo released by the Alaska State Department of Public Safety shows Robin Pelkey just before her 18th birthday. The remains of a woman known for 37 years only as Horseshoe Harriet, one of 17 victims of a notorious Alaska serial killer, have been identified through DNA profiling as Robin Pelkey, authorities said Friday, Oct. 22, 2021. (Alaska State Department of Public Safety via AP)
DNA match IDs serial killer’s victim after 37 years

Robin Pelkey was 19 and living on the streets of Anchorage when she was killed by Robert Hansen in the early 1980s, investigators said.

A moose is photographed in Kalifornsky, Alaska, in July 2020. (Peninsula Clarion file)
Illegal moose harvest down from past 5 years

The large majority of moose this year were harvested from North and South Kasilof River areas.

Renee Behymer and Katelyn Behymer (right) of Anchorage win this week’s vaccine lottery college scholarship sweepstakes. (Photo provided)
Dillingham and Anchorage residents win 6th vaccine lottery

“Get it done,” one winner said. “Protect us all, protect our elders and our grandchildren.”

Most Read