Kenai Peninsula College: Around Campus

  • By Suzie Kendrick
  • Sunday, November 20, 2016 7:24pm
  • NewsSchools

Instructor Bob Amundson has announced that he will again offer Humanities A220: Film as/and Literature this spring. The popular 3-credit, online course focuses on Film Noir and the literature that inspired these “dark films” which were produced between 1945 and 1955. Film Noir, a term coined by French film critics, has been recognized as a unique American cinematic art form. Common characteristics of these films include the use of black and white film and high contrast lighting, and voice-over narration allowing stories to unfold as a series of flashbacks.

Film Noir plot lines dealt with doomed love triangles, femme-fatales, obsessive/aberrant behaviors, lone-wolf and altruistic private eyes, and a host of alienated and flawed characters set against the backdrop of large, impersonal cities in post-World War II America.

The fiction that inspired many of these classic films has been recently “rediscovered” by colleges and literary critics, and the “look” of noir films has been mirrored in many graphic novels and recent films, such as Blade Runner, Sin City, The Crow and Dark City.

Students will watch several classic noir films and are assigned readings including works by Lionel White (“Clean Break”), David Goodis (“Dark Passage”), Patricia Highsmith (“Strangers on a Train”) and Kenneth Fearing (“The Big Clock”). For more information, please contact Amundson at bobamundson@hotmail.com.

Another fun and insightful online course offered next semester is Instructor Ron Levy’s 3-credit, ART 194: Ethics in Media and Photography: The Boundaries of Truth, Credibility and Deception in a Digital World.

Levy invites students to engage their senses and explore their assumptions, learn when to listen and when to be silent and to gain perspective when partaking of what is available in today’s vast media arena.

Last semester, Levy, a 30-year career photographer for magazines, newspapers and news agencies based in the U.S. and abroad, provided a presentation on the subject that can be reviewed here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LE65BPzIYKs

Students with pending applications to attend KPC in spring 2017 are offered priority registration this week. The public can register the following week beginning at 12:01 a.m. on Nov. 28. Students are urged to register early to avoid disappointment.

KPC’s spring 2017 searchable schedule is accessible from the homepage under the Academics menu and registration is available at UAOnline. Spring semester classes begin on Jan. 17.

KRC will be holding the first annual EMT/Paramedic/Firefighting open house from 6-8 p.m. on Thursday, Dec. 1, 2016 in the EMS classroom in Goodrich room 144. This event is intended to provide an all-inclusive opportunity for prospective students (and parents) to learn what benefits that these KPC programs have to offer.

There will be faculty advisors, instructors and former students available to provide information on the wide variety of opportunities available. Staff will provide tours of the emergency medicine laboratory and offer a detailed presentation covering the differences in the various programs (AAS Paramedic Technology, Firefighter 1 Academy, Emergency Trauma Technician, Emergency Medical Technician 1, 2, &3). Participants will learn about the advantages of various career paths, depending on each student’s ultimate goal. “We intend to provide guidance and advising to ensure proper course sequencing. Our intent is for students to leave with a ‘plan’ to guide them,” said Tiffany Perry, EMT instructor.

For more information, call Paul or Tiffany Perry at 262-0378 or 262-0278 or email peperry@alaska.edu.

This column is provided by Suzie Kendrick, Advancement Programs Manager at Kenai Peninsula College.

More in News

Graphic by Ashlyn O'Hara
Borough, school district finalizing $65M bond package

Efforts to fund maintenance and repairs at school district facilities have been years in the making

Peter Segall / Juneau Empire
Members of the House Majority Coalition spent most of Friday, May 13, 2022, in caucus meetings at the Alaska State Capitol, discussing how to proceed with a large budget bill some have called irresponsible. With a thin majority in the House of Representatives, there’s a possibility the budget could pass.
State budget work stretches into weekend

Sessions have been delayed and canceled since Wednesday

Peter Segall / Juneau Empire
Alaskans for Better Government members La quen náay Liz Medicine Crow, Richard Chalyee Éesh Peterson and ‘Wáahlaal Gidáak Barbara Blake embrace on the floor of the Alaska State Senate following the passage of House Bill 123, a bill to formally recognize the state’s 229 federally recognized tribes.
Tribal recognition bill clears Senate, nears finish line

Senators say recognition of tribes was overdue

The Alaska Division of Forestry’s White Mountain crew responds to a fire burning near Milepost 46.5 of the Sterling Highway on Tuesday, May 10, 2022, near Cooper Landing, Alaska. (Photo courtesy Cooper Landing Emergency Services)
Officials encourage residents to firewise homes

The central peninsula has already had its first reported fires of the season

In this September 2017 file photo from the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, beluga whales arch their backs through the surface of the water. Of Alaska’s five distinct beluga whale populations, only Cook Inlet’s is listed as endangered. (Courtesy the Alaska Department of Fish and Game)
Celebrate belugas with virtual programming next week

The three-day event will include conferences and activities

Capt. Corey Wheeler, front, commander of B Company, 1st Battalion, 52nd Aviation Regiment at Fort Wainwright, Alaska, walks away from a Chinook helicopter that landed on the glacier near Denali, April 24, 2016, on the Kahiltna Glacier in Alaska. The U.S. Army helped set up base camp on North America’s tallest mountain. The U.S. Army is poised to revamp its forces in Alaska to better prepare for future cold-weather conflicts, and it is expected to replace the larger, heavily equipped Stryker Brigade there with a more mobile, infantry unit better suited for the frigid fight, according to Army leaders. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen, File)
Army poised to revamp Alaska forces to prep for Arctic fight

The U.S. has long viewed the Arctic as a growing area of competition with Russia and China

A man fishes in the Kenai River on July 16, 2018, in Soldotna, Alaska. (Peninsula Clarion/file)
Emergency orders, fishing conditions updated

The Alaska Department of Fish and Game Division of Sport Fish released a Northern Kenai fishing report Friday

My Alaskan Gifts is seen at the Kenai Municipal Airport on Wednesday, May 11, 2022. (Camille Botello/Peninsula Clarion)
Kenai Municipal Airport gets gift shop

Locally sourced Alaska products are the newest addition to the Kenai Municipal… Continue reading

FILE - A sign requiring masks as a precaution against the spread of the coronavirus on a store front in Philadelphia, is seen Feb. 16, 2022. Philadelphia is reinstating its indoor mask mandate after reporting a sharp increase in coronavirus infections, Dr. Cheryl Bettigole, the city’s top health official, announced Monday, April 11, 2022. Confirmed COVID-19 cases have risen more than 50% in 10 days, the threshold at which the city’s guidelines call for people to wear masks indoors. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
US marks 1 million COVID-19 deaths; 15 more reported in Alaska

The state Department of Health and Social Services reported 15 more COVID-19… Continue reading

Most Read