Photo by Megan Pacer/Peninsula Clarion Carmen West, of Hatchers Pass, takes a quick coffee break while carving up her masterpiece creation during this year's Sawfest Competition during Progress Days on Saturday, July 23, 2016 outside Stanley Chrysler in Soldotna, Alaska.

Photo by Megan Pacer/Peninsula Clarion Carmen West, of Hatchers Pass, takes a quick coffee break while carving up her masterpiece creation during this year's Sawfest Competition during Progress Days on Saturday, July 23, 2016 outside Stanley Chrysler in Soldotna, Alaska.

Keep progressing: Soldotna celebration mixes it up

  • By MEGAN PACER and BEN BOETTGER
  • Saturday, July 23, 2016 9:10pm
  • News

Soldotna’s annual Progress Days festival held true to its name this year, with individual events keeping things fresh by making some changes from years past.

Returning for year 57, Progress Days features a weekend full of activities to celebrate Soldotna’s past as well as where it’s headed in the future, including a parade, rodeo events, and this year a celebration in downtown Soldotna called Market Daze. Some events, like the Sawfest Chainsaw Carving Competition and the Alaska State Championship Dutch Oven Cooking Contest, embraced the meaning of progress by switching things up over the weekend.

For the first time since Sawfest has been absorbed into Progress Days, the carvers eagerly sliced and whittled away at cedar logs, secured by Eric Berson, owner of The Dreamer’s Woods in Sterling. Berson also spends time carving in Washington, where cedar is plentiful, and said he offered to order some logs for the competition while making his usual requests.

“It’s nice and soft … beautiful wood,” Berson said. “It’s rot resistant and bug resistant … it’s getting harder to find big wood up here in Alaska that isn’t rotten. The spruce have been beetle-killed so long that you find a good, you know, a big-sized log and it’s cracked and rotten.”

Several carvers praised the quality of the cedar Saturday, a wood not many Alaska carvers get to work with often.

“As far as a carving medium, it’s unbelievable,” said Jamie Rothenbuhler, of Wasilla, who was competing again after some time away from the event.

Cedar requires only a light touch, makes for quicker carving and allows competitors to get more detailed in their work, said Scott Hanson, the original creator of Sawfest. His large bear carved against a tree stood tall among the other masterpieces Saturday.

Since there was already a separate, smaller tree growing out of his log, Hanson said the decision of what to make came easily.

“The log did speak to me,” he said with a smile.

Just across the way at Soldotna Creek Park, the Dutch Oven Cooking Contest took on a different tone than in years past.

With only three teams entered, Sally Oelrich said the competition was more laid back.

Cooks took time to chat with visitors, explain their processes and share recipes. Ray Wall and Brian Smith of Anchorage had extra recipes for their three dishes on hand to give away, as well as a sign up sheet for when they ran out.

Each team spent the better part of Saturday morning maneuvering around piping hot ovens and plumes of smoke while baking, cooking and sneaking the occasional peak at their competitors’ progress. Father-daughter team Rod and Chelsea Hutchings, also of Anchorage, worked together for the first time in the adult competition — having just turned 18, Chelsea competed in the junior level until this summer.

“We’ve practiced for like, the last two weeks doing these a couple times. Bread’s our worst thing,” Rod Hutchings said with a laugh. “We do not do breads. This is our first time in competition to ever make bread.”

One of the biggest threats to a successful meal made with a Dutch oven is wind, said Rick Oelrich, Sally’s husband and teammate.

Wind blows across the charcoal and takes away its heat, he said.

“You can adjust for almost (anything,) but it takes checking and so on,” said Sally Oelrich, who has been working with Dutch ovens in some form for about 30 years.

The Hutchings team protected their charcoal with aluminum covers wrapped around it and pinned together.

This year Anchorage-based bird rescue non-profit Bird TLC released their fifth wild eagle at Progress Days.

Although missing from the schedule last year due to lack of an eagle, this year’s release starred Bumper, a 3-year-old eagle that Bird TLC rescued from a dumpster in Unalaska and named for the abrasion injuries from his attempts to escape from the dumpster.

“Nobody’s sure why he was in there,” said Bird TLC volunteer Dave Dorsey. “Someone must have thrown away a perfectly good eagle.”

Although in past releases volunteers from the audience have opened the eagle’s transport box, Bumper was released by two local law enforcement representatives — Lt. Dane Gilmore of the Alaska State Troopers Soldotna post and Soldotna Police Chief Peter Mlynarik — as well as Senator Peter Micciche (R-Soldotna) and KSRM radio general manager Matt Wilson.

Tammi Murray of the Soldotna Chamber of Commerce, who organized this and past eagle releases, said she’d decided this year to dedicate the event to law enforcement officers, recognizing those recently killed in the Lower 48. The release was preceded by a moment of silence and a speech by Micciche.

After participating in his first eagle release, Gilmore said he was “just glad everything went alright.”

Also new to Progress Days this year was the Market Daze, a joint effort between the business owners of Mountain Mama Originals, Artzy Junkin, Where It’s At and more in downtown Soldotna.

The market celebration included a beer and wine garden, live music, vendors, arts and crafts and kids activities. Festival organizers also added a youth calf-riding event to the rodeo for riders age 0–16.

 

Reach Megan Pacer at megan.pacer@peninsulaclarion.com. Reach Ben Boettger at ben.boettger@peninsulaclarion.com.

Photo by Megan Pacer/Peninsula Clarion Eric Berson, of The Dreamer's Woods in Sterling, peers around a section of his masterpiece creation - a bench framed by two eagles - during this year's Sawfest Competition during Progress Days on Saturday, July 23, 2016 outside Stanley Chrysler in Soldotna, Alaska.

Photo by Megan Pacer/Peninsula Clarion Eric Berson, of The Dreamer’s Woods in Sterling, peers around a section of his masterpiece creation – a bench framed by two eagles – during this year’s Sawfest Competition during Progress Days on Saturday, July 23, 2016 outside Stanley Chrysler in Soldotna, Alaska.

Photo by Megan Pacer/Peninsula Clarion Sally and Rick Oelrich prepare dough for baking for this year's Alaska State Championship Dutch Oven Competition during Progress Days on Saturday, July 23, 2016 at Soldotna Creek Park in Soldotna, Alaska.

Photo by Megan Pacer/Peninsula Clarion Sally and Rick Oelrich prepare dough for baking for this year’s Alaska State Championship Dutch Oven Competition during Progress Days on Saturday, July 23, 2016 at Soldotna Creek Park in Soldotna, Alaska.

Photo by Megan Pacer/Peninsula Clarion Chelsea Hutchings, of Anchorage, checks the temperature of the bread she and her father, Rod Hutchings, made during this year's Alaska State Championship Dutch Oven Competition during Progress Days on Saturday, July 23, 2016 at Soldotna Creek Park in Soldotna, Alaska.

Photo by Megan Pacer/Peninsula Clarion Chelsea Hutchings, of Anchorage, checks the temperature of the bread she and her father, Rod Hutchings, made during this year’s Alaska State Championship Dutch Oven Competition during Progress Days on Saturday, July 23, 2016 at Soldotna Creek Park in Soldotna, Alaska.

Photo by Megan Pacer/Peninsula Clarion Rod Hutchings, right, maneuvers around his 18-year-old daugter, Chelsea Hutchings, as they work to create three dishes during the Alaska State Champion Dutch Oven Competition during Progress Days on Saturday, July 23, 2016, at Soldotna Creek Park in Soldotna, Alaska.

Photo by Megan Pacer/Peninsula Clarion Rod Hutchings, right, maneuvers around his 18-year-old daugter, Chelsea Hutchings, as they work to create three dishes during the Alaska State Champion Dutch Oven Competition during Progress Days on Saturday, July 23, 2016, at Soldotna Creek Park in Soldotna, Alaska.

Ben Boettger/Peninsula Clarion Members of the Kenai-Soldotna Shriner's Club distribute candy to a young spectator of Soldotna's Progress Days parade on Saturday, July 23 in Soldotna.

Ben Boettger/Peninsula Clarion Members of the Kenai-Soldotna Shriner’s Club distribute candy to a young spectator of Soldotna’s Progress Days parade on Saturday, July 23 in Soldotna.

Ben Boettger/Peninsula Clarion Leashed by their owner Sybille Castro, daschunds Joy Joy (front) and Waikiki wait to join Soldotna's Progress Days Parade as part of the "Weenies on Parade" contingent on Saturday, July 23 in Soldotna. Local daschund owners have been marching in the parade for 23 years - last year forming a weenie pack of 84, according to organizer Dianne Fielden. "Our goal is 100 weenies by 2018," Fielden said.

Ben Boettger/Peninsula Clarion Leashed by their owner Sybille Castro, daschunds Joy Joy (front) and Waikiki wait to join Soldotna’s Progress Days Parade as part of the “Weenies on Parade” contingent on Saturday, July 23 in Soldotna. Local daschund owners have been marching in the parade for 23 years – last year forming a weenie pack of 84, according to organizer Dianne Fielden. “Our goal is 100 weenies by 2018,” Fielden said.

More in News

Spruce trees are photographed in Seldovia, Alaska, on Sept. 26, 2021. (Clarion file)
Arbor Day grant application period opens

The program provides chosen applicants with up to $400 to buy and ship trees to their schools.

Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, and Sen. Dan Sullivan, R-Ark., leave the chamber after a vote on Capitol Hill in Washington, early Wednesday, May 10, 2017. A magistrate ruled Tuesday, Oct. 19, 2021, that there is probable cause for a case to continue against a man accused of threatening to kill Alaska’s two U.S. senators in profanity-filled voicemails left on their office phones. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
Grand jury will get case of man threatening to kill senators

He is accused of making threats against U.S. Sens. Lisa Murkowski and Dan Sullivan.

This illustration provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in January 2020 shows the 2019 Novel Coronavirus. (CDC)
Virus death toll soars

The state reported 66 more COVID deaths Tuesday, some recent and some as far back as April.

Kelly Tshibaka addresses members of the community at Nikiski Hardware & Supply on Friday, April 9, 2021 in Nikiski, Alaska. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
Peninsula campaign cash going to Tshibaka

Tshibaka raised about $1.2 million between Jan. 1 and Sept. 30.

Associated Press
The Statement of Facts to support the complaint and arrest warrant for Christian Manley say that Manley, the Alabama man accused of using pepper spray and throwing a metal rod at law enforcement protecting the U.S. Capitol during the Jan. 6 insurrection, has been arrested in Alaska.
Authorities arrest Alabama man in Alaska after Jan. 6 riot

The FBI took Christian Manley into custody Friday in Anchorage.

Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion
Gates indicate the entrance of Soldotna Community Memorial Park on Tuesday in Soldotna.
Soldotna’s cemetery expanding

The expansion is expected to add 20 years worth of capacity to the existing cemetery.

In this Aug. 26, 2020, file photo, U.S. Rep. Don Young, an Alaska Republican, speaks during a ceremony in Anchorage, Alaska. The longest-serving Republican in the U.S. House is appearing in a new round of ads urging Alaskans to get vaccinated against COVID-19. Ads featuring Young are being paid for by the Conquer COVID Coalition, Young spokesperson Zack Brown said by email Monday, Oct. 18, 2021. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen, File)
Young urges vaccination in new ads

Young, 88, “believes the vaccines are safe, effective and can help save lives.”

A portable sign on the Sterling Highway advertises a Pfizer COVID-19 vaccinaton booster clinic held 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday, Oct. 15, 2021, at Homer High School in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)
What you need to know about boosters

COVID-19 vaccine eligibility explained

Damage in a corner on the inside of the middle and high school building of Kachemak Selo School Nov. 12, 2019, in Kachemak Selo, Alaska. (Photo by Victoria Petersen/Peninsula Clarion)
Repair costs rise as school facilities deteriorate

About $420 million worth of maintenance is needed at Kenai Peninsula Borough School District buildings.

Most Read