Cadence Cooper, a 6th grade student at Tustumena Elementary, inspects a plant by the side of a trail behind the school on Tuesday, May 22, 2018 in Kasilof, Alaska. (Photo by Elizabeth Earl/Peninsula Clarion)

Cadence Cooper, a 6th grade student at Tustumena Elementary, inspects a plant by the side of a trail behind the school on Tuesday, May 22, 2018 in Kasilof, Alaska. (Photo by Elizabeth Earl/Peninsula Clarion)

Elementary classes clean up, improve nearby trails

Almost as soon as they made it through the back gate at Tustumena Elementary School, Shonia Werner’s sixth-grade students were scampering down the trail in search of plants.

Not just any plants, though — after all, they were in a forest in springtime. Most of them were equipped with woodcut signs bearing the common and scientific names of native plants along the path, and they were searching for specimens to plant their signs next to.

That can be harder than it sounds. Student Jordan Hinz, equipped with a sign for black cottonwood trees, peered at various trees as he walked, wondering which one would meet the criteria. Upon finding a likely specimen, he asked for confirmation from Jen Hester, the invasive species specialist and Adopt-A-Stream program coordinator for the Kenai Watershed Forum.

Hester has been working with classes in the Kenai Peninsula Borough School District throughout the year as part of the Adopt-A-Stream program, in which elementary school students work with the Kenai Watershed Forum to visit area streams to make observations and test water quality, among other activities. But the plant identification signs were extra.

“That was all (the students’) idea,” Hester said. “The high schoolers worked with them to make the signs.”

Sixth-grader Cadence Cooper said the class came up with the idea for the signs as a group . On May 22, the second-to-last day of school, the class headed out to the trails behind the school where many of them cross-country skied in the winter to place the signs.

“It was one of our class goals, to improve the trail,” she said.

They weren’t the only class to improve a neighboring trail. The previous Friday, Jason Daniels’ fifth-grade glass at Kalifornsky Beach Elementary trooped out into the gloomy gray weather to clean up and mark native plants on their own trail, which runs from the elementary school across Community College Drive out to Slikok Creek.

The Tustumena class found relatively little trash or trail damage, but the K-Beach Elementary class had plenty of work to do. Grass had grown up between the slats of the wooden boardwalks across wetlands, live trees stretched their branches across the walkway and dead ones impeded passage. While a parent chaperone took on the tree branches that needed cutting with a handsaw, Hester handed out tools to the students to clean up the trail.

Once they made it out to the salmon viewing platform on Slikok Creek, they began working on their own plant identification signs. Though the ones the K-Beach students put together are only printouts in laminate covers for now, they’ll be wood signs in the future, Daniels said. The fifth-grade class next year will also work on replacing a section of the boardwalk along with their regular water quality sampling, he said.

“They’re getting to see a lot of different kinds of terrain along the trail, with the wetlands,” she said. “I came out early and (identified) the plants out here, then the kids made the signs.”

K-Beach student Mya Fielden said her favorite part of the work was being out on the trail. “I like that we actually got to come out here.”

Students in both classes said they enjoyed getting the chance to be outside. Between flurries of working on the trail and pointing out plants, the K-Beach students peered into the creeks, snagged trash from along the walkway and took measurements — with help from Hester and Daniels — on the low-lying sections of the path that need a new boardwalk section.

Several of Werner’s students at Tustumena Elementary mentioned an earlier trip the class took to the Alaska Center for Coastal Studies’ Peterson Bay Field Station on the south side of Kachemak Bay, where they did more wildlife identification work.

“We try to get outside as much as we can,” Werner said.

Reach Elizabeth Earl at eearl@peninsulaclarion.com.

A sign with the English and scientific names of the lowbush cranberry plant sits on a desk before 6th grade students from Tustumena Elementary School place it on a school trail on Tuesday, May 22, 2018 in Kasilof, Alaska. (Photo by Elizabeth Earl/Peninsula Clarion)

A sign with the English and scientific names of the lowbush cranberry plant sits on a desk before 6th grade students from Tustumena Elementary School place it on a school trail on Tuesday, May 22, 2018 in Kasilof, Alaska. (Photo by Elizabeth Earl/Peninsula Clarion)

Heaven Engle, a 6th grade student at Tustumena Elementary School, inspects a lowbush cranberry on a trail near the school on Tuesday, May 22, 2018 in Kasilof, Alaska. (Photo by Elizabeth Earl/Peninsula Clarion)

Heaven Engle, a 6th grade student at Tustumena Elementary School, inspects a lowbush cranberry on a trail near the school on Tuesday, May 22, 2018 in Kasilof, Alaska. (Photo by Elizabeth Earl/Peninsula Clarion)

Heaven Engle, a 6th grade student at Tustumena Elementary School, poses with her plant identification sign on a trail near the school on Tuesday, May 22, 2018 in Kasilof, Alaska. (Photo by Elizabeth Earl/Peninsula Clarion)

Heaven Engle, a 6th grade student at Tustumena Elementary School, poses with her plant identification sign on a trail near the school on Tuesday, May 22, 2018 in Kasilof, Alaska. (Photo by Elizabeth Earl/Peninsula Clarion)

Jordan Hinz (left) askso for advice from Jen Hester (right) of the Kenai Watershed Forum to identify a black cottonwood tree on a trail near the school on Tuesday, May 22, 2018 in Kasilof, Alaska. (Photo by Elizabeth Earl/Peninsula Clarion)

Jordan Hinz (left) askso for advice from Jen Hester (right) of the Kenai Watershed Forum to identify a black cottonwood tree on a trail near the school on Tuesday, May 22, 2018 in Kasilof, Alaska. (Photo by Elizabeth Earl/Peninsula Clarion)

Kalifornsky Beach Elementary School fifth grade students Justyce Stockman (left), Kyrie Watson (center) Kennedy Marshal (second from right) and Alyssa McDonald (right) work together to assemble plant identification signs on a trail near the school on Friday, May 18, 2018 near Soldotna, Alaska. The class worked with the Kenai Watershed Forum this year to improve the trail and place plant identification signs along it. (Photo by Elizabeth Earl/Peninsula Clarion)

Kalifornsky Beach Elementary School fifth grade students Justyce Stockman (left), Kyrie Watson (center) Kennedy Marshal (second from right) and Alyssa McDonald (right) work together to assemble plant identification signs on a trail near the school on Friday, May 18, 2018 near Soldotna, Alaska. The class worked with the Kenai Watershed Forum this year to improve the trail and place plant identification signs along it. (Photo by Elizabeth Earl/Peninsula Clarion)

Kalifornsky Beach Elementary School fifth grade student Caitlyn Crapps rakes away dead material from a trail near the school on Friday, May 18, 2018 near Soldotna, Alaska. The class worked with the Kenai Watershed Forum this year to improve the trail and place plant identification signs along it. (Photo by Elizabeth Earl/Peninsula Clarion)

Kalifornsky Beach Elementary School fifth grade student Caitlyn Crapps rakes away dead material from a trail near the school on Friday, May 18, 2018 near Soldotna, Alaska. The class worked with the Kenai Watershed Forum this year to improve the trail and place plant identification signs along it. (Photo by Elizabeth Earl/Peninsula Clarion)

A sign mounted by 5th grade students from Kalifornsky Beach Elementary School stands beside a trail near Kenai Peninsula College on Friday, May 28, 2018 in Soldotna, Alaska. (Photo by Elizabeth Earl/Peninsula Clarion)

A sign mounted by 5th grade students from Kalifornsky Beach Elementary School stands beside a trail near Kenai Peninsula College on Friday, May 28, 2018 in Soldotna, Alaska. (Photo by Elizabeth Earl/Peninsula Clarion)

Kalifornsky Beach Elementary School fifth grade students in Jason Daniels’ class peer into Slikok Creek from a bridge on a trail near the school on Friday, May 18, 2018 near Soldotna, Alaska. The class worked with the Kenai Watershed Forum this year to improve the trail and place plant identification signs along it. (Photo by Elizabeth Earl/Peninsula Clarion)

Kalifornsky Beach Elementary School fifth grade students in Jason Daniels’ class peer into Slikok Creek from a bridge on a trail near the school on Friday, May 18, 2018 near Soldotna, Alaska. The class worked with the Kenai Watershed Forum this year to improve the trail and place plant identification signs along it. (Photo by Elizabeth Earl/Peninsula Clarion)

Kalifornsky Beach Elementary School fifth grade teacher Jason Daniels (left) helps students Mya Fielden and Draek Harris measure the distance across a puddle along a trail near the school on Friday, May 18, 2018 near Soldotna, Alaska. The class worked with the Kenai Watershed Forum this year to improve the trail and place plant identification signs along it. (Photo by Elizabeth Earl/Peninsula Clarion)

Kalifornsky Beach Elementary School fifth grade teacher Jason Daniels (left) helps students Mya Fielden and Draek Harris measure the distance across a puddle along a trail near the school on Friday, May 18, 2018 near Soldotna, Alaska. The class worked with the Kenai Watershed Forum this year to improve the trail and place plant identification signs along it. (Photo by Elizabeth Earl/Peninsula Clarion)

Kalifornsky Beach Elementary School fifth grade students Kennedy Whitney (left), Marshal Burnett (center) and Alyssa McDonald (center) work together to distribute plant identification signs they made on a trail near the school on Friday, May 18, 2018 near Soldotna, Alaska. The class worked with the Kenai Watershed Forum this year to improve the trail and place plant identification signs along it. (Photo by Elizabeth Earl/Peninsula Clarion)

Kalifornsky Beach Elementary School fifth grade students Kennedy Whitney (left), Marshal Burnett (center) and Alyssa McDonald (center) work together to distribute plant identification signs they made on a trail near the school on Friday, May 18, 2018 near Soldotna, Alaska. The class worked with the Kenai Watershed Forum this year to improve the trail and place plant identification signs along it. (Photo by Elizabeth Earl/Peninsula Clarion)

More in News

Alaska House Speaker Louise Stutes, center, along with leaders of the House majority coalition, Rep. Bryce Edgmon, left and Rep. Kelly Merrickspeaks, right, speak to reporters on the final day of a special legislative session in Juneau, Alaska Friday, June 18, 2021. The special legislative session limped toward a bitter end Friday, with Alaska Gov. Mike Dunleavy and House majority leaders sharply disagreeing over the adequacy of the budget passed by lawmakers earlier this week. (AP Photo/Becky Bohrer)
Special session limps toward its end, another looms

Gov. Mike Dunleavy and House majority leaders sharply disagreed on the adequacy of the budget passed by lawmakers.

Brent Hibbert (left) presents Tim Dillon with a commending resolution on Tuesday in Soldotna. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
KPEDD honored with assembly resolution

The resolution praised, among other things, KPEDD’s work in helping distribute federal COVID-19 relief funds.

The Kenai Public Dock is seen on Friday, June 18, 2021 in Kenai, Alaska. (Ashlyn O'Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
Kenai dock repairs substantially complete

The dock, which was built in 1986, sustained damage from multiple earthquakes, including in November of 2018.

Screenshot 
A recently released map by the National Telecommunications and Information Administration shows the vast areas of low data speeds and access by broadband users across Alaska and the rest of the U.S.
White House laying groundwork for improved internet infrastructure

In Alaska, providers are looking at their own improvments to access.

Kate Cox, 12, testifies before the Kenai City Council on Wednesday, June 16, 2021 in Kenai, Alaska. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
Council, public voice support for Triumvirate land donation

The land is located near Daubenspeck Park by the Kenai Walmart.

Part of the hose line laid around the perimeter of the 102-acre Loon Lake Fire to help firefighters extinguish any hot spots is seen on Thursday, June 17, 2021 on the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska. (Bryan Quimby/Gannett Glacier Fire Crew)
Loon Lake Fire reaches 100% containment

The 102-acre fire was first reported on the evening of June 12 and is said to have been caused by lightning.

A-10 Thunderbolt II aircraft assigned to the 25th Fighter Squadron taxi during exercise Red Flag-Alaska 21-02 at Eielson Air Force Base on June 14. 
Tech. Sgt. Peter Thompson / U.S. Air Force
Air Force kicks off major multinational exercise in Alaska

More than 100 aircraft from three countries will be involved.

Ron Gillham, who represents District 30 in the Alaska House of Representatives, is seen here in this undated photo. (Courtesy Ron Gillham)
Gillham files intent to run in 2022 primary

Gillham did not indicate the office he plans to run for.

Most Read