Chugach National Forest prepares for avalanche season

November is Avalanche Awareness Month.

While the central peninsula has yet to see significant snowfall, November marks Avalanche Awareness Month, and the Chugach National Forest is preparing for avalanche season in Alaska’s backcountry.

“Our goal is to increase avalanche awareness on the Chugach National Forest through advisories and public outreach to reduce avalanche accidents and fatalities by providing information and advice on how to manage avalanche concerns on any given day,” Chugach National Forest Avalanche Information Center Director Wendy Wagner said in a Monday press release. “We tend to focus on slab avalanches, as they are the main type of avalanche that causes the most harm to people.”

Observations, forecasts and daily advisories for the backcountry will be available from the Information Center from November to April. Forest Service avalanche specialists work out of the Chugach National Forest Glacier Ranger District in Girdwood.

Snowboarders, skiers, snowshoers, snowmachine riders, hikers, climbers and other outdoor enthusiasts can stay safe by being prepared and avoiding dangerous situations.

To stay safe, the Chugach National Forest recommends avalanche awareness training, knowing and understanding the conditions, carrying rescue gear like an avalanche beacon, shovel and probe.

Most people caught in an avalanche actually trigger the slide as they travel on or beneath unstable snow, the release said.

Free information is provided by the Chugach National Forest to the public with the goal of reducing and preventing backcountry avalanche accidents.

Resources are available online at www.cnfaic.org.

More in News

This 2020 electron microscope made available by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention image shows the spherical coronavirus particles from the first U.S. case of COVID-19. (C.S. Goldsmith, A. Tamin/CDC via AP)
7 new COVID-19 cases, 4 on peninsula

Cases were reported in Anchorage, Kenai, Homer and in unspecified areas of the peninsula.

Registered Nurse Cathy Davis (left) and Chief Nursing Officer Dawn Johnson (right) work at a table to get COVID-19 tests ready for the public Friday, May 29, 2020 at the Boat House Pavilion on the Homer Spit in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Megan Pacer/Homer News)
Expanding testing available on southern peninsula

South Peninsula Hospital announced last week it would begin offering free, rapid COVID-19 testing.

The entrance to the Kenai Peninsula Borough building in Soldotna is photographed on Monday, June 1. (Photo by Brian Mazurek/Peninsula Clarion)
Borough begins reopening

The reopenings are part of phase one of the borough’s approach to reopening responsibly.

The women’s field takes to the course Tuesday, July 4, 2017, at the Mount Marathon Race in Seward, Alaska. Eventual winner Allie Ostrander is to the right of Christy Marvin (1). (Photo by Jeff Helminiak/Peninsula Clarion)
Mount Marathon Race canceled for 2020

The 93rd running of the race up and down the 3,022-foot mountain is rescheduled for July 4, 2021.

A graph by the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services created on its Coronavirus Datahub on Sunday, May 31, 2020, shows the number of positive COVID-19 cases acquired by day since the first cases were recorded in March. The increase of 27 cases on May 31 marks the largest single jump in one day in Alaska. (Graphic courtesy of Alaska Department of Health and Social Services)
Alaska sees biggest jump in COVID-19 cases yet

Kenai, Homer, Soldotna, Kenai Peninsula Borough and Anchor Point all reported cases.

Signs along Poopdeck Street on Friday, May 29, 2020, in Homer, Alaska, offer inspiration during the COVID-19 pandemic. Put up by the South Kenai Peninsula Resiliency Coalition, the signs read “Daily life loooks very different now. Routine and structure create a sense of safety. How can your daily rhythm support you?” (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)
2 new peninsula COVID-19 cases Saturday

DHSS also announced two other Alaska cases, one for Anchorage and one for Wasilla.

Kenai Peninsula Boys & Girls Clubs CEO Rachel Chaffee, right loads up a pallet with goods that Carlile driver Robert Ivy will take back to Carlile’s Kenai headquarters, where it will then be transported to Anchorage and ultimately Seward, at Kenai Central High School in Kenai, Alaska on May 28, 2020. (Photo by Brian Mazurek/Peninsula Clarion)
Boys Girls Clubs expanding meal service

The nonprofit is serving about 650 meals a day across the peninsula.

Alaska VA to break ground on new clinic

The clinic will be located at 241 East Rockwell Ave. in Soldotna.

Specimens to be tested for COVID-19 are seen in Surrey, B.C., on Thursday, March 26 . (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Borough looks at purchasing new COVID-19 testing machine

The platform would be purchased for no more than $400,000, with expected delivery in four to six months.

Most Read