Alaska to provide public voter data if records fee paid

  • By Becky Bohrer
  • Wednesday, August 23, 2017 9:57pm
  • News

JUNEAU — Alaska’s lieutenant governor said the state will provide publicly available data to President Donald Trump’s commission investigating alleged voter fraud — for $21.

Lt. Gov. Byron Mallott said the standard fee to obtain a list that includes the names of voters and their political affiliations is $20. There is an additional $1 charge to get that information on a CD.

In a letter to commission Vice Chair Kris Kobach, dated Monday, Mallott said the state will provide a CD with “the publicly available information that the state regularly provides to the public” in response to records requests upon receipt of that fee.

The Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity requested numerous pieces of voter information, if publicly available under state law, including voter names, addresses, party affiliation, voter histories, information regarding any felony convictions and the last four numbers of voters’ Social Security numbers. It also sought input on election laws and processes.

Voter data considered public in Alaska includes names, voter statuses, mailing addresses, voter registration dates, party affiliations, district and precinct designations and voter histories, Mallott’s office has said.

Mallott said the state will not provide information considered confidential under state law, including dates of birth, Social Security information, voter signatures and residential addresses if voters had asked to keep those addresses private.

Mallott, who oversees elections in Alaska, defended the state’s election system, saying there is “no evidence that cyber intruders tried to delete or alter voter data prior to or after the November 8, 2016 election in Alaska.”

He also said Alaska’s elections system is “well on its way to becoming one of the most accurate and secure in the United States.”

He cited system safety features and state participation in a program aimed at improving the accuracy of voter rolls.

He also noted an initiative passed last year tying voter registration to applying for a dividend check from Alaska’s oil-wealth fund. The state will leverage fraud detection resources that are part of the dividend application system to further protect the election system, he wrote.

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