Hal and Helen Rohlman (Photo courtesy Roy Mullin Photography)

Hal and Helen Rohlman (Photo courtesy Roy Mullin Photography)

Weddings

Hal and Helen Rohlman of Sterling will celebrate 60 years of marriage on Sept. 10, 2014.

They were married in Tacoma, Washington, on Sept. 10, 1954, shortly after Hal’s discharge from the Navy. Upon completion of schooling at Central Washington State College, Hal taught school in Tacoma for a few years before moving to Casa Grande, Arizona, Fort Collins, Colorado, and finally Anchorage, where both of them were employed by the Anchorage School District until their retirement in 1987. The years of 1986-86 were spent in Girgarre, Australia where Hal was an exchange teacher and Helen and elementary teacher.

Many summers were spent with Hal as a seasonal park ranger with the National Park service in Mount Ranier National Park, Sunset Crater National Monument, Rocky Mountain National Park, Katmai National park and Bering Land Bridge National Archeological Preserve, where both Helen and Hal were park rangers.

Along the way, four children were born to the couple: Kathleen, Richard, Robert and Krista. As the summer employment was in the parks, the children spent many years growing up and enjoying these natural wonders.

The family has grown with the addition of five grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

Since retiring, Hal and Helen have traveled extensively worldwide and also enjoyed much of their winters in Mexico. Future plans include a river trip on the Rhine River this year and a return to the beaches of Mexico.

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