Christine Kulcheski wears a 2000s-era jacket and hat by Ahna Iredale and Barb Meyers at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Saturday, Nov. 17 in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Christine Kulcheski wears a 2000s-era jacket and hat by Ahna Iredale and Barb Meyers at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Saturday, Nov. 17 in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

‘Time Traveling’ shows Wearable Arts of past, present and maybe future

The Homer Fiber Arts Collective and Bunnell Street Arts Center powered up its time machine last Saturday for the 2018 Wearable Arts show.

Titled “Time Traveling,” the annual exhibit of couture, fashion, handcrafted art and just plain silliness added a new twist this year. Along with recent works — many done through Artist in Residence Keren Lowell’s workshops this fall — the show included fiber art created in and reflecting the style of the 1980s, 1990s and 2000s, along with some some playful anachronisms. Kari Multz, one of the artistic producers, came up with the Time Traveling idea. Helping her produce the show were Lynne Burt, Marie Walker and AnnMargret Wimmerstedt.

Held at Land’s End Resort, show organizers set up the traveling concept with ushers in jumpsuits and holding light wands. Looking like Leonardo DiCaprio faking an airline pilot in “Catch Me As You Can,” “Captain” Michael Walsh walked around with a cocktail glass that he insisted only had water. Wearing a snappy pillbox hat and 1960s-style uniform, flight attendant Asia Freeman, Bunnell’s artistic director, served guests seated in special first class front rows.

The retrospective part of Wearable Arts offered a look back at some of the talent that started the show. Burt helped start Wearable Arts about 35 years ago when it was called Steppin’ Out. Burt said she was pleased to see work by longtime artists like Nancy Wise, Kiki Abrahamson, Linda Skelton, Kathy Smith, Judy Little and others.

“When you see those pieces come back, we forgot how awesome some of that stuff is,” Burt said.

Along with the retrospective works, Wearable Arts featured more than 50 new pieces. The Homer Fiber Arts Collective sewers, knitters and crafters focus on well-made works that can be worn as everyday wear or for special occasions. Some entries use the human body as platform for imaginative sculptures, like Lucas Thoning’s “Anthronetic Technlogy” that included an iPad or Julie Tomich’s “Space Fish” with wire, copper, bull kelp and LED lights.

Art on exhibit at Bunnell for Lowell’s residency also was modeled. Playing with the idea that time occasionally got warped, some of Lowell’s works became costumes for skits. “Rough Beast,” described as “a spectre of dread” is made of fur, hair and bone, and was part of a prehistoric scene that also included Carla Cope’s “Mammoth’s Night Out” and Christine Kulcheski’s “Coyote Huntress.”

Two other Lowell works, “Ozymandias,” a plaster of paris armor plate, and “Worry Coat,” a tunic with found objects, were worn by Craig Phillips and Adele Person playing lost Roman citizens.

“Where are their slaves?” Phillips asked.

“These people are slaves, and their masters are called ‘smart phones,’” Person replied.

Reach Michael Armstrong at marmstrong@homernews.com.

Bobbye Hurd wears a 1980s era jacket by Nancy Wise at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Bobbye Hurd wears a 1980s era jacket by Nancy Wise at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Taylor Andrade wears a 1980s era dress by Holly at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Taylor Andrade wears a 1980s era dress by Holly at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Ja’hnie Triplett wears a 1980s era jacket by Nancy Wise at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Ja’hnie Triplett wears a 1980s era jacket by Nancy Wise at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Bobbye Hurd wears a 1980s era dress by Lila Johnson at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Bobbye Hurd wears a 1980s era dress by Lila Johnson at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Rebeka Tufares wears a 1980s era jacket by Barb and C.A. Meyers at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Rebeka Tufares wears a 1980s era jacket by Barb and C.A. Meyers at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Christine Kulcheski wears a 1980s era jacket by Linda Skelton at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Christine Kulcheski wears a 1980s era jacket by Linda Skelton at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Bobbye Hurd models “Wild Turkey” by Kiki Abrahamson at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17 at Land’s End Resort in Homer. Made of turkey feathers, spent shotgun shells, hay-bale twine and harness leather, it was one of the more playful outfits at the show. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)
                                To read more about the Wearable Arts show, see page 16.

Bobbye Hurd models “Wild Turkey” by Kiki Abrahamson at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17 at Land’s End Resort in Homer. Made of turkey feathers, spent shotgun shells, hay-bale twine and harness leather, it was one of the more playful outfits at the show. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News) To read more about the Wearable Arts show, see page 16.

Mandy Bernard models Kari Multz’s “Pioneer on the Moon” at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Mandy Bernard models Kari Multz’s “Pioneer on the Moon” at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Britt Huffman models Carly Garay’s “The Head” at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Britt Huffman models Carly Garay’s “The Head” at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Rebeka Tufares wears models Kari Multz’s “Moon Dreams & Pioneer’s Reality” at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Rebeka Tufares wears models Kari Multz’s “Moon Dreams & Pioneer’s Reality” at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Katie Jo Gamble models “Asian Inspiration” by Linda Martin and Lin Hampson at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Katie Jo Gamble models “Asian Inspiration” by Linda Martin and Lin Hampson at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Adele Person models Lynn Burt’s “Piece of the Pie” and Gail Baker’s “Warmth” silk scarf at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Adele Person models Lynn Burt’s “Piece of the Pie” and Gail Baker’s “Warmth” silk scarf at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Bobbye Hurd models “Freedom Being” by Kimora Love Buster at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Bobbye Hurd models “Freedom Being” by Kimora Love Buster at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Christine Kulcheski models “Time Walker” by Marie Walker, based on a photograph of her husband’s grandmother, at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Christine Kulcheski models “Time Walker” by Marie Walker, based on a photograph of her husband’s grandmother, at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Britt Huffman models “Grey Skies” by Lynn Burt with a black leather bag by Mary Hayden at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Britt Huffman models “Grey Skies” by Lynn Burt with a black leather bag by Mary Hayden at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Britt Huffman models “Travelling Hexis Through States” by Linda Skelton at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Britt Huffman models “Travelling Hexis Through States” by Linda Skelton at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Craig Phillips wears Keren Lowell’s “Ozymandias” at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Craig Phillips wears Keren Lowell’s “Ozymandias” at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Rebeka Tufares models “Feathers and Hoops” by Lila Johnson at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Rebeka Tufares models “Feathers and Hoops” by Lila Johnson at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Katie Jo Gamble models “Quilted Artist’s Travel Bag” by Meriam Linder and scarves by Gail Baker at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Katie Jo Gamble models “Quilted Artist’s Travel Bag” by Meriam Linder and scarves by Gail Baker at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Christine Kulcheski models “Brailer Dress” by Cassie Brooks of NOMAR at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Christine Kulcheski models “Brailer Dress” by Cassie Brooks of NOMAR at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Taylor Andrade models “Pioneer Avenue Reflection” by Kari Multz at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Taylor Andrade models “Pioneer Avenue Reflection” by Kari Multz at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Rebeka Tufares models “Sleepy Unicorn” by Bobbye at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Rebeka Tufares models “Sleepy Unicorn” by Bobbye at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Craig Phillips, left, and Adele Person model “Modern Icelandic Yoke Sweathers #1 and #2” by Ginger VanWagoner at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Craig Phillips, left, and Adele Person model “Modern Icelandic Yoke Sweathers #1 and #2” by Ginger VanWagoner at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Cindy Brinkerhoff models “Space Fish” by Julie Tomich at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Cindy Brinkerhoff models “Space Fish” by Julie Tomich at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Ja’hnie Triplett models “Our Anger, Like Bees, Will Pour From our Mouths” by Ann-Marget Wimmerstedt at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Ja’hnie Triplett models “Our Anger, Like Bees, Will Pour From our Mouths” by Ann-Marget Wimmerstedt at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Mandy Bernard, left, models her “Soft Sculpture, Blue” and Rebekah Tufares, right, models Bernard’s “Soft Sculpture, Chatruese at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Mandy Bernard, left, models her “Soft Sculpture, Blue” and Rebekah Tufares, right, models Bernard’s “Soft Sculpture, Chatruese at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Lucas Thoning models his “Anthronetic Technology” at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Lucas Thoning models his “Anthronetic Technology” at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Lucas Thoning models his “Anthronetic Technology” at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Lucas Thoning models his “Anthronetic Technology” at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Mandy Bernard models “Dangerous Coat” by Catriona Reynolds at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Mandy Bernard models “Dangerous Coat” by Catriona Reynolds at the 2018 Wearable Arts on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

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