Aluminum cans (Peninsula Clarion file photo)

Aluminum cans (Peninsula Clarion file photo)

Recycling Bin: Sorting is the key

  • Sunday, January 6, 2019 1:42am
  • Life

The key to recycling is sorting: Separating recyclables and putting in an assigned bin.

Let’s refresh.

Aluminum Cans: Empty food and beverage cans; NO other aluminum products or tin.

Corrugated cardboard: Flatten; look for ridges; NO waxed cardboard or paperboard (cereal or beverage containers, NO greasy pizza boxes).

Glass containers: Clean; remove lids.

Mixed Paper: Catalogs, magazines, softcover books, telephone books, file folders, paperboard (cereal boxes, paper-roll cylinders); NO newspaper, NO milk, soup, or juice boxes).

Newspaper: Clean and dry.

Plastic Bags/Plastic Film: Clean grocery bags, dry cleaner bags, stretch wrap, trash bags, ziplock bags, bubble wrap.

Plastic PETE 1: Anything (clean) with PETE 1 symbol.

Plastic PETE 2: Anything (clean) with PETE 2 symbol.

Tin Cans: Clean; can be recycled as tin/steel if magnet sticks to container.

Questions? Check-out the KPB Solid Waste website or call 262-9667.

Let’s think “Recycling” before throwing into the landfill.

Information is provided by ReGroup, a nonprofit educational group formed to provide public awareness of the benefits of waste reduction, reuse and recycling on Alaska’s Kenai Peninsula.


Information is provided by ReGroup, a nonprofit educational group formed to provide public awareness of the benefits of waste reduction, reuse and recycling on Alaska’s Kenai Peninsula.


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