Poet’s Corner: Inheritances

Inheritances

By Hedy-Jo Huss, Soldotna

A will legally transfers property

of the deceased’s to survivors.

The basis of giving a mystery to rivals.

Contested wills can prompt sibling

estrangement, allliances and “lawyering up.”

A family feud? All want to fill their cup.

Lucky me! I’ve received doozies.

Wonderful leaded crystal glassware

lounge in their case.

To serve my guests would be a waste.

Handstitched pillows …

covered with willows.

“Bed in a Bag” or Nordstrom’s

sale on 600-thread sheets

fills my sails.

Fireplace tools have no place — alas.

We have forced air — gas.

Sixty-six pairs of salt and pepper shakers;

guess there were no takers.

An infamous “kitty klock”

I would have tried, but

it was cross-eyed.

My enthusiasm died.

Where’s land, my farm?

Found out Cousin Ralph got it.

Twenty acres, burned buildings;

he had a fit.

It’s in South Dakota, so

my Cuz doesn’t give an iota.

Decoy ducks; not one is carved wood.

And, having glass eyes, they should.

Mikimoto pearls they’re not.

A peeling, plastic, pathetic string yet.

No way that necklace will

ever adorn my neck!

A beehive honey jar

that won’t be filled.

Diabetics is what we are.

All-in-all, it was nice to be remembered.

Maybe you’ll think your own will

should be dismembered.

You could sort, designate and donate.

This done while you’re with us,

will prevent later fuss.

More in Life

Achieving the crispy, flaky layers of golden goodness of a croissant require precision and skill. (Photo by Tresa Dale/Peninsula Clarion)
On the strawberry patch: Reaching the pinnacle of patisserie

Croissants take precision and skill, but the results can be delightful

This 1940s-era image is one of few early photographs of Cliff House, which once stood near the head of Tustumena Lake. (Photo courtesy of the Secora Collection)
Twists and turns in the history of Cliff House — Part 1

Here, then, is the story of Cliff House, as least as I know it now.

File
Minister’s Message: What’s in a name?

The Scriptures advise, “A good name is rather to be chosen than great riches.”

Visitors put on personal protective equipment before an artist talk by Dr. Sami Ali' at the Jan. 7, 2022, First Friday opening of her exhibit, "The Mind of a Healthcare Worker During the COVID-19 Pandemic," at the Homer Council on the Arts in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)
ER doctor’s paintings follow passage of pandemic

Dr. Sami Ali made 2019 resolution to paint every day — and then the COVID-19 pandemic hit.

Almond flour adds a nuttiness to this carrot cake topped with cream cheese frosting. (Photo by Tressa Dale/Peninsula Clarion)
On the strawberry patch: A ‘perfect day’ cake

Carrot cake and cream cheese frosting make for a truly delicious day off

File
Minister’s Message: A prayer pulled from the ashes

“In that beleaguered and beautiful land, the prayer endures.”

A copy of “The Year of Magical Thinking” by author Joan Didion is displayed on an e-reader. (Photo by Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
Off the Shelf: Didion’s “Year of Magical Thinking” is a timely study on grief

‘The last week of 2021 felt like a good time to pick up one of her books.’

Megan Pacer / Homer News
Artist Asia Freeman, third from left, speaks to visitors on Nov. 1, 2019, at a First Friday art exhibit opening at Kachemak Bay Campus in Homer.
Freeman wins Governor’s Arts Humanities Award

Bunnell Street Arts Center artistic director is one of nine honored.

Zirrus VanDevere’s pieces are displayed at the Kenai Art Center on Jan. 4, 2022. (Courtesy Alex Rydlinski)
A journey of healing

VanDevere mixes shape, color and dimension in emotional show

Traditional ingredients like kimchi, ramen and tofu are mixed with American comfort food Spam in this hearty Korean stew. (Photo by Tressa Dale/Peninsula Clarion)
On the strawberry patch: Warm up with army base stew

American soldiers introduced local cooks to some American staple ingredients of the time: Spam and hotdogs.

File
Peninsula Crime: Bad men … and dumb ones — Part 2

Here, in Part Two and gleaned from local newspapers, are a few examples of the dim and the dumb.