“Rescued Seal Pup Release, Kenai River, Sept. 23, 2023,” by Susan Watkins, is included as part of the People’s Choice Judged Exhibition at the Kenai Art Center in Kenai, Alaska, on Wednesday, Jan. 31, 2024. (Jake Dye/Peninsula Clarion)

“Rescued Seal Pup Release, Kenai River, Sept. 23, 2023,” by Susan Watkins, is included as part of the People’s Choice Judged Exhibition at the Kenai Art Center in Kenai, Alaska, on Wednesday, Jan. 31, 2024. (Jake Dye/Peninsula Clarion)

‘People’s Choice’ show makes attendees the judges at Kenai Art Center

A voting box will be present at the center all month, with each person getting one vote

At the Kenai Art Center this month, a judged show is being held where each attendee is asked to play the title role. “People’s Choice — Judged Exhibition” will be open throughout the month, featuring artwork from local artists. Each attendee can cast a ballot for their favorite piece in the show, with cash prizes being awarded to those voted first, second and third place.

Charlotte Coots, executive director at the center, said Wednesday that there’s a broad variety of styles on display — that hanging the show on the gallery’s walls had been a challenge as she sought to distribute different pieces.

On the walls are many paintings, but there are also photographs, sculptures and other displays. One piece, filling space in the middle of the gallery, is “a little bit political,” Coots said. Each piece was submitted to the center in January by a local artist — the result a broad display of local talent.

“Come to the show, look at everything. See which one is your favorite.”

A voting box will be present at the center all month, with each person getting one vote. Coots said there are no categories for medium or style, every piece is competing for the same awards.

An opening reception will be held tonight, Feb. 2, at the center from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. There will be refreshments and live music by the Tune Weavers.

The exhibition — and voting — will be open during gallery hours, noon to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday until Feb. 24. The winners will be announced on the center’s website and social media after the show closes.

For more information about the Kenai Art Center, including upcoming exhibitions and programming, find “Kenai Art Center” on Facebook or visit kenaiartcenter.org.

Reach reporter Jake Dye at jacob.dye@peninsulaclarion.com.

“Vision,” by Moira Ireland, is included as part of the People’s Choice Judged Exhibition at the Kenai Art Center in Kenai, Alaska, on Wednesday, Jan. 31, 2024. (Jake Dye/Peninsula Clarion)

“Vision,” by Moira Ireland, is included as part of the People’s Choice Judged Exhibition at the Kenai Art Center in Kenai, Alaska, on Wednesday, Jan. 31, 2024. (Jake Dye/Peninsula Clarion)

“ChaCha,” by Melinda Hershberger, is included as part of the People’s Choice Judged Exhibition at the Kenai Art Center in Kenai, Alaska, on Wednesday, Jan. 31, 2024. (Jake Dye/Peninsula Clarion)

“ChaCha,” by Melinda Hershberger, is included as part of the People’s Choice Judged Exhibition at the Kenai Art Center in Kenai, Alaska, on Wednesday, Jan. 31, 2024. (Jake Dye/Peninsula Clarion)

“Will it Work?,” by Chris Jenness, is included as part of the People’s Choice Judged Exhibition at the Kenai Art Center in Kenai, Alaska, on Wednesday, Jan. 31, 2024. (Jake Dye/Peninsula Clarion)

“Will it Work?,” by Chris Jenness, is included as part of the People’s Choice Judged Exhibition at the Kenai Art Center in Kenai, Alaska, on Wednesday, Jan. 31, 2024. (Jake Dye/Peninsula Clarion)

”Cascading Culture,” by Zirrus VanDevere, hangs as part of the People’s Choice Judged Exhibition at the Kenai Art Center in Kenai, Alaska, on Wednesday, Jan. 31, 2024. (Jake Dye/Peninsula Clarion)

”Cascading Culture,” by Zirrus VanDevere, hangs as part of the People’s Choice Judged Exhibition at the Kenai Art Center in Kenai, Alaska, on Wednesday, Jan. 31, 2024. (Jake Dye/Peninsula Clarion)

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