Kalbi ribs can be served with an assortment of side dishes, including white rice, kimchi, roasted garlic cloves, broccoli salad, dumplings and soup. (Photo by Tressa Dale/Peninsula Clarion)

Kalbi ribs can be served with an assortment of side dishes, including white rice, kimchi, roasted garlic cloves, broccoli salad, dumplings and soup. (Photo by Tressa Dale/Peninsula Clarion)

On the strawberry patch: Marking 1 year with a festive feast

Kalbi marinade makes ribs that taste like a party

At this time last year, I was agonizing over what I would write and cook for my very first article.

I went into this with the faked confidence of an imposter. I was sure many cooks and writers out there would have been better suited for the task, but I was grateful for the opportunity, and determined to earn my place in the paper.

In the end, my biggest asset was the anonymity that made me bold enough to write with sincerity. I didn’t grow up here, and I know only a handful of you (who don’t share my last name), but you might know me quite well now.

On our last Friday night in Korea, my sister and I went out with our classmates to celebrate. We took the train to another district where we met our friends at a famous Kalbi restaurant that served the tastiest white kimchi in the city.

The dining room was overflowing out onto the sidewalk where they had set up temporary tables with barrels and boxes for chairs. We all crowded around out in the chilly spring air and talked while our meat cooked and occasional raindrops spattered on the grill.

In between lettuce-wrapped mouthfuls we teased and joked and voted on which of our karaoke staples would be declared the official song of the trip. We sang an early happy birthday to a classmate and kept each other’s soju glasses full until we all marched back to the dorms through the blinking lights and rain, loudly singing our chosen anthem all the way.

Try as I might, I haven’t been able to re-create that most amazing water kimchi, but my Kalbi marinade makes ribs that taste like a party.

Kalbi ribs

Ingredients:

4 pounds beef short ribs

¾ cup packed brown sugar

3 tablespoons rice wine vinegar

¾ cup soy sauce

1/3 cup water

1 white onion

1 pear or 1 sweet apple

6 large garlic cloves

2 tablespoons minced ginger

3 green onions

½ teaspoon black pepper

2 tablespoons sesame oil

1 teaspoon Korean red pepper powder (optional)

Directions:

Rinse and inspect the meat for bone fragments, then dry thoroughly and place in a large mixing bowl.

Sprinkle the brown sugar over the meat and rub to coat.

Cover and allow the meat to rest in the refrigerator for 30 minutes.

In a food processor, puree the onion, pear or apple and garlic. Use water to help create a smooth texture.

Pour the puree over the meat.

Add the black pepper, soy sauce, sesame oil and chopped green onions.

Gently toss the meat in the marinade, being sure to coat completely.

Cover again and let marinade for at least 4 hours in the refrigerator; overnight is best.

Grill over hot coals or flame for 5 minutes each side or until cooked to desired doneness.

Serve with plenty of side dishes like white rice, kimchi, roasted garlic cloves, broccoli salad, dumplings and soup. The best way to enjoy is to use a lettuce leaf to make a pouch filled with bits of meat and vegetables that you wrap up and eat all in one bite. It’s fun to experiment with different flavor and texture combinations so the more side dishes the better.

Thank you all for letting me share my life and kitchen with you over this last year, and I look forward to sharing more with you in the time to come.

More in Life

Virginia Walters (Courtesy photo)
Life in the Pedestrian Lane: Spring Fever

“OK, Boomer” is supposed to be the current put down by the “woke generation”

A headstone for J.E. Hill is photographhed in Anchorage, Alaska. (Findagrave.com)
Night falls on the Daylight Kid — Part 2

“Bob,” he said, “that crazy fool is shooting at us.”

File
Minister’s Message: Has spring sprung in your life?

Christ also offers us an eternal springtime of love, hope and life

Eggs Benedict are served with hollandaise on a bed of arugula and prosciutto. (Photo by Tressa Dale/Peninsula Clarion)
On the strawberry patch: Honoring motherhood, in joy and in sorrow

Many who have suffered this loss believe they must bear it in silence for the sake of propriety

Page from Seward daily gateway. (Alaska State Library, Archives and Museum, Juneau, A.K.)
Night falls on the Daylight Kid — Part 1

Night Falls on the Daylight Kid—Part One By Clark Fair

Meredith Harber (courtesy)
Minister’s Message: Spread love in these challenging times

I don’t know about you all, but the world feels pretty rough these days

Photos by Sean McDermott 
Artist Amber Webb starts works on a new drawing at Bunnell Street Arts Center. Her work will be on display at the gallery through the month of May.
Where the waters mixed

Artist uses art to explore the blurred boundaries between sorrow and celebration, hardship and healing

A copy of “Firefighting: the Financial Crisis and Its Lessons” rests against a typewriter on Wednesday, May 4, 2022, in Kenai, Alaska. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
Off the Shelf: An economy on fire

“Firefighting: The Financial Crisis and Its Lessons” gives a retrospective on the 2008 financial crisis

Camille Botello / Peninsula Clarion
Prints are featured in the “Open Watercolor” show at the Kenai Art Center on Wednesday.
Playing with paint

Art center’s new exhibit displays the versatility of watercolors

Kalbi ribs can be served with an assortment of side dishes, including white rice, kimchi, roasted garlic cloves, broccoli salad, dumplings and soup. (Photo by Tressa Dale/Peninsula Clarion)
On the strawberry patch: Marking 1 year with a festive feast

Kalbi marinade makes ribs that taste like a party

Will Morrow (courtesy)
Moving on

I suggested to my wife that we could replace the old kids’ car with something “fun”

On Oct. 3, 1945, the Spokane Chronicle published this A.P. photo of Miriam Mathers and her goats as she prepared to board a Seattle steamship bound for Seward.
Tragedy and triumph of the Goat Woman — Part 4

Mathers had only three cents in her purse when she arrived in Kenai