Minister’s Message: We can each be a VIP to someone

We call them a VIP, “very important person.” That person may be a public servant, a law enforcement officer, a teacher, a medical provider, or a president. They stand out in their position and by their performance.

Our calendar commemorates a statesman, presidents, an explorer, and veterans with a national holiday. Other individuals or groups are recognized with a special day. Every four years on January 20, a newly-elected or reelected President of the United States is inaugurated. These all play an important part in history.

We may not have the opportunity to meet a national or international VIP, but we can be very important to someone.

The following quote has been attributed to many, including Dr. Seuss. “To the world you may be one person; but to one person you may be the world.” This is especially true for parents.

I am very thankful for Glenn and Lottie Glover. I am the last of their five children from a marriage cut short by death. I don’t remember much of my dad, being only 5 years old when he drowned. What I recall of him is someone who had a good sense of humor, a strong work ethic and loving care for his children. He did the best he could with what he had to provide for his family.

My mother continued that effort alone for a time, helped by her extended family, and then was joined by my stepfather. We never had much but we always had enough, especially friends, fun and good food. In winter, stoking the wood stove, shoveling snow, and keeping up with school made sure we stayed busy. In summer, we stayed up late and enjoyed swimming at the beach on sunny days. We were very important to one another, though we didn’t express it directly. Now, as adults with our own families, the remaining siblings try to let the others know how important they are.

Parents today are met with many challenges in raising their children. Hectic school and sports schedules can keep them running. Social media and the Internet can take up a lot of time and have the potential for much negative input. “Gaming” can expose children to corrupt content and use up valuable time. Parents exercising their “very important person” responsibility to their kids can be hectic but necessary. Long-term benefits are at stake.

Here is a good resolution for the New Year: “I will try to be very important in someone’s life this year.” A parent, marriage partner or a pal does this on a regular basis. This desire displays a willingness to “go the second mile” to help out in whatever way possible. The “golden rule” is put into practice; “So whatever you wish that others would do to you, do also to them.”

Last month we celebrated a very important birthday. The birth of Jesus Christ is celebrated at Christmas. Over 2,000 years ago that event took place in a small obscure place, yet it has impacted generation after generation. Over the years, Jesus has become more and more important to me. His presence is powerful, his word is true and his promises come to pass. I want that to continue this year and I hope you do too.

Mitch Glover is pastor of the Sterling Pentecostal Church located on Swanson River Road and Entrada. Services on Sunday include Bible classes for all ages at 10 a.m. and worship at 11 a.m. Thursday Bible study is at 7 p.m. (sterlingpentecostalchurch.com)

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