Minister’s Message: The Light has come

Today is the day — December 21st — the longest day of darkness. Throughout the ages and the world’s vast geography the presence of light has regulated how people live, conduct activities, and spend their time.

Light, for many positive reasons, is associated with things that are good while darkness is often seen as negative. Light exposes, while darkness hides.

In Alaska, we can applaud the “winter solstice” as now the hours of daylight are longer, but it often feels in life that there is more darkness than light.

It still seems that in darkness there is a longing or something missing. Who hasn’t spent hours awake at night focusing on the undone, waiting for the light of a new day? Think of all the children this time of year, waiting to open and see their gifts that are under the Christmas tree.

A Christmas tradition celebrated by many is called Advent. It is a Latin term meaning “waiting for the arrival,” as people remember and wait to celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ. Often weeks before Christmas people will light a candle on an Advent wreath each Sunday to look forward to trait that God would share with His creation.

Candles would be lit for joy, peace, hope and love. In the Bible we read about God’s love for people and his plan to be back in relationship with His creation. God’s plan was to send himself in the divine person of Jesus Christ. This plan was foreshadowed in Isaiah 9:2: “The people walking in darkness have seen a great light; on those living in the land of deep darkness a light has dawned.”

God chose to send himself, “For to us a child is born, to us a son is given, and the government will be on his shoulders. And he will be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.” (Isaiah 9:6).

Jesus wrapped himself in humility and divinity as He was born in stable on Christmas. While His parents, angels and shepherds rejoiced that night, the light of that celebration reaches throughout eternity.

Christmas means that God was willing to come into a dark place and bring the light of salvation. Because of Jesus, all of God’s creation has an opportunity to be in relationship with the living God. Jesus described His mission on earth as He declared in John 8:12, “I am the light of the world. Whoever follows me will never walk in darkness, but will have the light of life.”

Your life may feel dark and lifeless, but Jesus has provided a way to be in relationship with God as Jesus is the Light of the world. When one makes Jesus Christ both Savior and Lord, the little babe born in Bethlehem comes in and turns on the light. It is then life begins as He gives us eternal life.

This Christmas celebrate the Light, by letting Jesus Christ be your source for life because, “The Light has come.”

Frank Alioto is a pastor and serves as a chaplain with Central Peninsula Hospital and Central Emergency Services.


Frank Alioto is a pastor and serves as a chaplain with Central Peninsula Hospital and Central Emergency Services.


More in Life

Bacon is prepared on a fire pit, June 19, 2020, in the Copper River Valley, Alaska. (Photo by Victoria Petersen/Peninsula Clarion)
Kalifornsky Kitchen: Eating from fire

My attitude toward camp cooking is that you can eat pretty much anything you would eat at home.

Irene Lampe dances a robe for its First Dance ceremony at the Sealaska Heritage Institute on Monday, June 22, 2020. (Courtesy photo | Annie Bartholomew)
Weavers celebrate new robe with first dance

The event is part of a resurgent trend for traditional weaving.

Kalifornsky Kitchen: Summer traditions

Over the years, a paella feed has marked momentous occasions, like moving or birthday parties.

Nick Varney
Unhinged Alaska: Looking in the rearview mirror

I stepped through a time warp last week.

Concert on Your Lawn revives spirit of KBBI festival

The concert came about after the pandemic forced KBBI to cancel a planned Solstice weekend concert.

Minister’s Message: Finding hope in dark times

A life lived without hope is like a life lived without love.

Morel pasta is enjoyed outside on May 19, 2019, near Kenai, Alaska. (Photo by Victoria Petersen/Peninsula Clarion)
Kalifornsky Kitchen: Morels all the ways

When the Swan Lake Fire started, we knew we had an opportunity to get even more morels.

This portrait—one of few that Richard Shackelford reportedly allowed to be published—graced the 1909 commencement booklet for the California Polytechnic School, of which he was the president of the Board of Trustees. (Photo courtesy Clark Fair)
A tale of Two Shacklefords, in a way — part three

Untangling the origins of Shackleford Creek’s name.

Virginia Walters (Courtesy photo)
Life in the Pedestrian Lane: It’s all in the game

It’s amazing what a deck of cards or a set of dice can teach a young person.

Kachemak Cuisine: Find comfort in hard times by cooking good food

The first tastes of spring for me are rhubarb, fresh-caught fish from Kachemak Bay and chives.

Fiddlehead ferns shooting up from the ground, on May 24 in Anchorage, Alaska. (Photo by Victoria Petersen/Peninsula Clarion)
Foraging for fiddleheads

Springtime in Alaska is the beginning of foraging season for me.