Minister’s Message: Do you remember?

What if “remembering” was an actual call and response to engagement?

  • Thursday, November 7, 2019 8:38pm
  • Life

When someone shares they “remember the good old days” they are typically referring to reminiscing about past happy memories.

Today, the act of “remembering” seems like an antiquated idea left for people who are not proficient with modern technology or even able to use a smartphone. The reasoning that often follows is “why should I remember or memorize something that I can quickly look up?”

What if “remembering” was an actual call and response to engagement?

The concept of God “remembering” in the Bible goes far beyond just the reciting of facts God knows. When the Bible says God “remembered,” there is focus and action on His faithfulness and everlasting care. In Jeremiah 31:34, God shares about His new covenant with His people: “For I will forgive their wickedness and will remember their sins no more.” God is choosing in His nature to not punish people for what they have done, but instead to forgive and choose not to remember the things that have separated them from a relationship with God. The original Hebrew verb “to remember” means “to bring someone to mind and then to act upon the person’s behalf.” Psalm 106:4 says, “Remember me, O Lord, when you show favor to your people; help me when you save them.” The Psalmist is asking God to remember and rescue him from his circumstances and appeals to God’s merciful character.

There are other examples of God “remembering” people like Noah, Ruth and Mary, and coming to their aid with His attention and provision. God’s action in “remembering” proclaims His love for creation and declares His ready presence for those who seek Him. When God’s creation set itself far away from following Him, God remembered us in sending His Son, Jesus, to make a way to be in relationship with God. What a great promise of how God remembers! Whatever you are facing today, consider this assurance: This I recall to my mind, Therefore I have hope. The LORD’S loving kindnesses indeed never cease, For His compassions never fail. They are new every morning; Great is Your faithfulness. “The LORD is my portion,” says my soul, “Therefore I have hope in Him.” (Lamentations 3:21-24)

Pastor Frank Alioto serves as a chaplain with Central Peninsula Hospital and Central Emergency Services.


• Pastor Frank Alioto serves as a Chaplain with Central Peninsula Hospital and Central Emergency Services.


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