Learning for Life: Safe and Effective Tree Felling, Limbing and Bucking

Learning for Life: Safe and Effective Tree Felling, Limbing and Bucking

  • Sunday, October 7, 2018 1:30am
  • Life

Felling trees, bucking logs, and cutting firewood are popular autumn activities. However, not everyone necessarily knows all of the safety precautions that should be used when handling logs. According to statistics collected monthly by the Tree Care Industry Association, accidents with chainsaws are regular and deadly for the average person who sets out to do some cutting of logs and trees. There are some basic and helpful methods that can be learned quickly, to help make the use of chainsaws safer. Take extra care, and prevent accidents. Our Cooperative Extension Service publication, “How to Cut Down a Tree: Safe and Effective Tree Felling, Limbing and Bucking,” is available for free in our office.

Your local Cooperative Extension Service is your year-round resource for a variety of topics, visit us today at: http://www.uaf.edu/ces/districts/kenai/ to find this publication and more or stop by and see us on K-Beach Road between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

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