Learning for Life: ‘I pledge my head to clearer thinking’

Do you have a tough decision that needs making, or a problem that needs solving? Have you considered asking a 4-H’er to help out?

4-H is a youth development program that helps children and teens develop the skills necessary to become good critical-thinkers, goal-setters, organizers and doers. By completing projects incorporating record keeping, public speaking, service learning, and resource allocation activities 4-H’ers learn the skills needed to become good managers of time, materials and human capital.

4-H builds upon the natural resilience of youth to help children and teens become thinking, responsible and helpful servant-leaders in our community. Each year local 4-H members grab media headlines with worthy ideas and solutions impacting important issues on the Kenai Peninsula. For more information about finding a 4-H’er to work with, or to enroll as a member or volunteer in the 4-H program, call the Cooperative Extension Service today at 262-5824.

4-H’ers are working right now to, “Make the Best Better,” on the Kenai Peninsula; community partners, sponsors and volunteers are needed to help them achieve this high calling. Join with 4-H today, and help us mold the leaders of tomorrow, today!

Submitted by Jason Floyd, 4-H and Youth Development Agent.

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