Waffles make mornings better, photographed on Dec. 24, 2020, in Anchorage, Alaska. (Photo by Victoria Petersen/Peninsula Clarion)

Waffles make mornings better, photographed on Dec. 24, 2020, in Anchorage, Alaska. (Photo by Victoria Petersen/Peninsula Clarion)

Kalifornsky Kitchen: Very extra waffles

Cornmeal adds a crunchy sweetness to the morning favorite

Almost every morning, I turn over in my bed and ask my partner if he’s going to make us pancakes. He never does. Sometimes, though, he’ll make waffles.

When we moved to Kenai, we acquired a waffle iron and Nate seems to prefer that to pancakes these days. However, when we were friends many years ago, and then began dating, pancakes were what we made. Sometimes for dinner, mostly for breakfast.

His favorite way to make pancakes was to always add cornmeal. I’ve never eaten pancakes like that, except with him. It gave the pancakes a crunch and a sweetness that wasn’t overwhelming. The same kind of batter can be ladled onto a sizzling skillet to be made as pancakes, but waffles are great for creating pockets of syrup and other delicious toppings.

The recipe below is a very extra way to make waffle batter, but it will be worth it. Whipping the egg whites into stiff peaks will make the waffle light and fluffy, while the cornmeal adds crunch and texture to the whole thing.

Very Extra Waffles

11⁄4 cup flour

3⁄4 cup cornmeal

1 tablespoon sugar

1 teaspoon baking powder

1 teaspoon sea salt

1⁄2 teaspoon baking soda

1 cup Greek yogurt

1 cup whole milk

4 large eggs, separate yolks and whites

Take out your waffle iron, and get it ready and turn it on per factory setting. In a large bowl, whisk together the dry ingredients, including the flour, cornmeal, sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt.

In a smaller bowl, whisk together yogurt, milk, melted butter and egg yolks. Combine the wet ingredients with the wet ingredients, carefully, until combined.

Using a whisk, or an electric mixer, whip the egg whites until they hold stiff peaks. You’ll know the peaks are stiff when you scoop up some of the beaten egg whites, and the egg whites hold their shape well. Adding this fluffy element will keep the waffles light. Fold the egg whites delicately into the rest of the batter until combined.

Once the waffle iron is heated, spray the iron with cooking spray, or coat with melted butter to keep the batter from sticking to the iron. Ladle about half a cup of the batter onto the waffle iron, and cook the waffles per your waffle iron’s instructions, until the waffle is crisp and golden in color. Serve waffles right away with butter, jam, syrup or peanut butter.

More in Life

Bunnell Street Arts Center Artist in Residence Nina Elder’s work is displayed on Thursday, Feb. 11, 2021, at the gallery in Homer, Alaska. At left are pieces from her series, “It Will Not Be the Same, But It Might Be Beautiful,” drawings of puzzle stones collected in the area near McCarthy, Alaska. At right is a drawing of frayed rope, part of her focus during her residency. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)
Visiting artist acknowledges ‘the brokenness but not throwing it away when it’s broken’

For Bunnell residency, artist also will look at frayed, found objects like rope and nets

A typical pesto pasta night at our house, Dec. 26, 2020, in Anchorage, Alaska. (Photo by Victoria Petersen/Peninsula Clarion)
Kalfironsky Kitchen: A fresh start with pesto

It’s bright. It’s green. It’s fresh. It’s cheesy. What’s not to love?

Image courtesy Clark Fair 
In 1920, two years after the killings in Kenai, William Dawson had a new business partner, Emil Berg. When they witnessed this bill of sale, both men signed their names to the document.
Exerting control in Old Kenai — Part 7

This is the seventh and final installment in a series about two killings that occurred in Kenai on April 8, 1918.

Virginia Walters (Courtesy photo)
Life in the Pedestrian Lane: Gone to the Dogs

Our first family dog was a shepherd sized mutt named Timber.

File
Minister’s Message: Finding peace outdoors in winter

I am a self-proclaimed “summer baby.”

Getting my ingredients ready for blueberry crumble, where the berries can be prepared right in the pan and the topping in a small bowl, on Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2021, in Anchorage, Alaska (Photo by Victoria Petersen/Peninsula Clarion)
Kalifornsky Kitchen: Something nice

It feels like the right time to make some of my grandma’s blueberry crumble.

Nick Varney
Unhinged Alaska: The Poe-etic potholes return

Well, 2021 has started off a bit shaky, especially weatherwise. Even though,… Continue reading

Part of the grave marker for Cleveland L. Magill. (Photo courtesy Clark Fair)
Exerting control in Old Kenai — Part 6

The sixth installment in a series about two killings that occurred in Kenai on April 8, 1918.

File
Minister’s Message: Love takes work

Love is more than a feeling or a one-day experience.

A Greek and Moroccan-inspired grain bowl made with elements of my favorite foods and flavors, photgraphed on Feb. 3, 2021, in Anchorage, Alaska. (Photo by Victoria Petersen/Peninsula Clarion)
Kalifornsky Kitchen: Grain bowl goodness

I’m thinking about food as an expression of myself and an opportunity to experiment in the kitchen.

This headline about the killings in Kenai appeared in the Cordova Daily Times four days after the incident.
Exerting control in Old Kenai — Part 5

The fifth installment in a series about two killings that occurred in Kenai on April 8, 1918

Will Morrow (courtesy)
Too close to home

‘More recently, those ads have taken a turn. And I have to say, it kind of hurts.’