Victoria Petersen / Peninsula Clarion 
Fresh citrus and pantry staples like taco seasoning and granulated garlic make for an easy and delicious baked salmon that’s ready to be enjoyed inside a taco.

Victoria Petersen / Peninsula Clarion Fresh citrus and pantry staples like taco seasoning and granulated garlic make for an easy and delicious baked salmon that’s ready to be enjoyed inside a taco.

Kalifornsky Kitchen: Salmon saves the day again

Salmon is extremely versatile, and can be spiced to go with a huge range of cuisines.

By Victoria Petersen

For the Peninsula Clarion

We’re still making our way through the salmon filets at the bottom of the freezer.

In the last week, we’ve eaten our leftover sun-dried tomato salmon with pasta and pesto. But there’s more salmon to be eaten, and I’m in the mood for different flavors. Luckily, salmon is extremely versatile, and can be spiced to go with a huge range of cuisines.

I took some tortillas out of the freezer, and I plan to put together an easy salsa tonight for salmon tacos.

This salmon will be made very similarly to last week’s salmon, but I’m swapping out sun-dried tomatoes and lemon for spices and lime for a salmon that can be flaked up and served in a taco.

Feel free to use this recipe to spice up your salmon in your favorite ways.

Ingredients:

1 salmon fillet

5-10 slices of thinly slices citrus of your choice (I used lime and mandarin oranges)

Juice from 1 lime

Salt and pepper to taste (I like a lot of each)

1/8 cup of olive oil

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In a baking sheet covered by foil, lay out your salmon fillets and season with the salt, pepper and lime juice. Carefully drizzle the oil over the salmon, until the fillet is mostly coated with the oil.

2. Bring up the edges of the foil around the fillet, creating a small basket for the salmon. Bake for about 20 minutes, or until it’s mostly pink and flakes away when a fork is pushed against the flesh.

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