Italian sweet red peppers for stuffing, English peas for braising

  • By Sue Ade
  • Tuesday, June 24, 2014 3:47pm
  • LifeFood

If you’ve ever been to the either the Dekalb Farmers Market or the Buford Highway Farmers Market, in the Atlanta area, you already know that they are international markets of global proportions, both figuratively and literally. The Dekalb Farmers Market, all 140,000 square feet of it, is a “true world market serving up to 100,000 people per week,” selling everything from produce, meat, seafood, dairy and bakery items, to spices, coffee, gadgets and books most of which cannot be typically found in your neighborhood grocery store. Equally grand is the 100,000 square foot Buford Highway Farmers Market, with its impressive array of international foods, arranged by country of origin. Whether you’re after fresh wild caught octopus from Japan, longan fruit from Thailand or walnut preserves from Azerbaijan, chances are more than good you’ll find it here. I needed two days and an overnight stay to complete my shopping, which resulted in a carload-full of fresh produce, two coolers filled with seafood, cheese and other perishables, and an assortment of spices, cocoas and bottled Asian sauces. From the Dekalb Farmers market, my searches for English peas for cooking French-style finally came to an end, and the sweet red Italian peppers, brilliant and fragrant, from the Buford Highway Farmers Market, perfect for stuffing and roasting, were just too beautiful to pass up. No matter where you live, the farmers market in your area is teeming with fresh treasures. Exploring them is fun, and there’s always something irresistible to be found.

 

Sue Ade is a syndicated food writer with broad experience and interest in the culinary arts. She has worked and resided in the Lowcountry of South Carolina since 1985 and may be reached at kitchenade@yahoo.com.

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