Going with the wind

The recent Kenai Peninsula wildfire gave me a better understanding of wind.

I’ve known since my years in Kid World that fires like wind. The first time I got down on hands and knees and blew on glowing tinder to get a fire going, I knew I was onto something.

Fire thrives on oxygen. The more wind, the more oxygen.

Wind dries out fuels such as grass and twigs, making fire spread like … well … like wildfire.

When wind blows hard enough, it can throw big chunks of burning material into the air and cause spot fires, or “spotting.”

Wind is unpredictable, and forecasts of it should be considered with a raised eyebrow.

Fires travel with the wind, so during the recent wildfire I focussed on the direction the wind was blowing. I live in Sterling, north of the river. For the first few days, the fire was reported to be “burning south” and “moving south.” Driven by a north wind, it was moving toward Tustamena Lake — good news for residents of Sterling and Soldotna. However, the fire was still burning on its north flank, even though it wasn’t moving much. It could be stopped there, if firefighters had enough time to establish a firebreak before the wind swung around and blew from the south. Without that firebreak, the fire could go north. The river would slow, but not stop it.

I knew that fire during the 1947 burn had jumped the river. Given that knowledge, my mental weather vane was up for any news about wind speed and direction. But the winds were fickle, first blowing from the north, then the west. Then the reports became confusing. One report was that “northern winds” had pushed the fire “in a couple of different directions.”

Northern winds? I knew that a north wind comes from the north, but I was unsure whether a “northern wind” came from the north or the south. And toward what “different directions” had it been pushed?

Later that same day came news that the weather forecast was for a north wind moving 15-20 miles per hour. That was good news, but then then it went bad: “However, Friday evening the wind is forecasted to change direction and will be moving from the southwest, according to weather service data. While that would push the fire to the southeast, winds are supposed to blow at about 5 miles per hour.”

That report worried me. A southwest wind wouldn’t push the fire to the southeast, but toward the northeast. Toward Sterling and Soldotna. I slept uneasily for a couple of nights.

As it turned out, fire did jump the Kenai River near the Kenai Keys, but it didn’t get far before firefighters stopped it. Employing water, retardant, firebreaks and backfires, they stopped it all along its northern flank.

Before this fire, I’d never given much thought to the various words used to describe wind. What’s sometimes confusing is that the English language makes special exceptions when it comes to wind.

Take the word “northerly.” Northerly means a northward position or direction. “Jim headed in a northerly direction.” However, when a reference is to wind, northerly means blowing from the north, as in “that northerly wind has a bite to it.”

The North Pole lies toward the north, but the north wind blows from the north.

The North Star is toward the north, but a “norther” comes from the north.

The South Pole lies toward the south, but a “southerly” wind comes from the south.

If you say the wind is blowing “northeastward,” you’re referring to a direction the wind is blowing toward, not the wind itself. On the other hand, a northeast wind would come from the southwest.

At this point, if you’re confused, I’ve done my job. Of course, all of this stuff about wind direction becomes moot if you don’t know north from south, but that’s meat for another column.

 

Les Palmer can be reached at les.palmer@rocketmail.com.

More in Life

Will Morrow (courtesy)
Forever young

I have sometimes wondered if I did, in fact, squander my youth.

A still from "Fantastic Fungi," showing at the 17th annual Homer Documentary Film Festival. (Photo provided)
Roll ‘em: DocFest returns for 17th year

Homer Documentary Film Festival returns with COVID-19 precautions and a solid line up of films.

Cooked by a combination of pan frying and steaming, delicate tofu and vegetable dumplings require a delicate hand and patience. (Photo by Tressa Dale/Peninsula Clarion)
On the strawberry patch: Chubby bites of goodness

Pan-fried and steamed tofu and vegetable dumplings take patience and practice.

Nick Varney
Unhinged Alaska: The inside story regarding moose

Moose derive their name from the Native American word, “Moswa,” meaning “twig eater.”

File
Minister’s Message: The myth of ‘success’

Take time to consider what really matters.

“Reimagine,” the 17th annual Burning Basket, catches fire in a field on Sunday, Sept. 13, 2020, near Homer. Artist Mavis Muller intended to broadcast live on Facebook and YouTube the burning of the basket, but because of technical difficulties that didn’t happen. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)
‘Recover’ brings Burning Basket back to Spit

Basket in a time of pandemic will seek to rebuild community, organizer says.

Homemade lemon curd and fruit are an easy way to fill puff pastry tart shells on the fly. (Photo by Tressa Dale/Peninsula Clarion)
On the strawberry patch: When life gives you puff pastry … make lemon curd

By my own necessity I have become resourceful, adaptable and a creative problem-solver.

Virginia Walters (Courtesy photo)
Life in the Pedestrian Lane: The final frontier

I never once even considered that in my lifetime it might be possible to exist in outer space …

Alaska felt artist Ruthie Ost Towner is pictured in this undated photo. Towner’s work is on display at the Soldotna Visitor Center through September. (Photo courtesy Naomi Gaede-Penner)
Alaska felt artist Ruthie Ost Towner is pictured in this undated photo. Towner’s work is on display at the Soldotna Visitor Center through September. (Photo courtesy Naomi Gaede-Penner)
Preserving the past with felt: Ruth Ost Towner

Ruthie untwists her thread, straightens her shoulders, reaches for a cup of coffee, and calculates her felt-making outcome.

The “Reindeer Man” exhibit featuring work by Kenai Art Center Executive Director Alex Rydlinski can be seen on Wednesday, Sept. 1, 2021, in Kenai, Alaska. (Photo courtesy Alex Rydlinski)
From birth to slaughter

Kenai Art Center exhibit chronicles a reindeer’s life

This base oatmeal muffin mix offers endless variations and can be paired with fresh fruits and berries. (Photo by Tressa Dale/Peninsula Clarion)
A muffin for all seasons

Accompany the summer berry bounty with this all-purpose oatmeal muffin.

Photos from Ancestry.com 
In January 1900, when Dr. R. J. Alcorn began serving a sentence for manslaughter, he posed for these mug shots as Convict #739.
Filling in the blanks: The Dr. Alcorn story — part 2

Although Dr. R. J. Alcorn spent only a few years in Alaska, he certainly got around.