Business News

■ The Kenai and Soldotna Chambers of Commerce will host a joint luncheon at noon on July 20 at the Kenai Visitors Center. A forum for candidates for U.S. Senate is planned. RSVP required to 283-1991.

First National Bank Alaska is the “Best Place to Work in Alaska,” according to an Alaska Business Monthly poll.

ABM announced the outcome of its first Best of Alaska Business Awards in its July issue.

First National received the Denali award and first place in the “Best Place to Work in Alaska” category. According to ABM, Denali “represents Alaska’s tallest peak and highest business honors.”

“Congratulations to (Chair and President) Betsy Lawer and First National for creating a workplace our readers called the best,” ABM Vice President and General Manager Jason Martin said.

First National currently employs some 670 Alaskans.

“For almost a century, First National has worked hard to build a team of local experts our fellow Alaskans can count on,” Lawer said. “Being named the ‘Best Place to Work in Alaska’ is a testament to the environment we’ve created, allowing our employees to do the best possible job for our customers.

“This recognition from Alaska Business Monthly readers is a tremendous honor and one of which every bank employee should be proud.”

First National was cited in part for its competitive salaries, good benefits and a pleasant working environment in 30 locations across the Great Land.

The University of Alaska Fairbanks Cooperative Extension Service has launched a series of short videos to help Alaskans manage their finances.

Topics in the Mastering Money Management series include improving your credit score, reading your credit report, children’s allowances, living on a seasonal income, automating your bill payments and what to do before choosing bankruptcy.

Roxie Dinstel, who has been teaching family finance classes for Extension for nearly 40 years, coordinated the series of five- to eight-minute YouTube videos. Ideas for topics came from agents and their clients, including farmers and fishermen, she said. Dinstel hopes the videos will be a quick resource that people can use.

Personal finance is important, she said. “But we’re not teaching it in school.”

Dinstel said Alaskans face special challenges for money management because of seasonal incomes, an uncertain state economy and budget cuts.

The videos are available at www.uaf.edu/ces/money. Eight have been posted, and more will be added this month. The videos were developed by Dinstel, agents Sarah Lewis and Linda Tannehill in Juneau and Soldotna, respectively, and media technician Jeff Fay. Former University of Alaska President Pat Gamble provided funding for the series. Anyone with ideas for additional video topics may contact Dinstel at 907-474-7201 or at rrdinstel@alaska.edu.

HEA crews will be working on a maintenance project in Nikiski, from approximately Mile 23 on the Kenai Spur Highway to the end of the road near Mile 36 during the month of June.

The crews will be installing new fuses along the power line which will improve the reliability of electric service.

The work may require a brief power outage. If an outage is required, the outage will be isolated to the location the crew is working and may last up to 30 minutes. No HEA member will see more than one outage related to the maintenance work.

If you have questions or need additional information, please call 1-800-478-8551.

The Kenai Soil & Water Conservation District has a DEC-approved mobile kitchen for rent by the day, week or season. The 6.5-by-12-foot trailer with ball hitch contains propane stove, griddle, refrigerator and small freezer, suitable for preparing and/or serving food at events (Kenai Peninsula only). Call Larry Marsh at 262-9671 for additional specifications and rental requirements.

Have you opened a new business, moved to a new location, hired a new person or promoted an employee? Send us your information at news@peninsulaclarion.com, fax it to 907-283-3299, or drop it by the Clarion at 150 Trading Bay in Kenai. Questions? Call 907-335-1251.

Business announcements may be submitted to news@peninsulaclarion.com. Items should be submitted by 5 p.m. on the Friday prior to publication.

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