ADVANCE FOR THE WEEKEND OF DEC. 12-13 AND THEREAFTER - In this Feb. 14, 2014 photo, snow experts Mike Janes, left, and Ed Shanley assess conditions on Mount Roberts above Juneau, Alaska. The 2015 Southeast Alaska Avalanche Center's Southeast Alaska Snow and Avalanche Workshop featured topics included decision-making, a forecaster's perspective on assessing avalanches, how wind affects snow conditions, emerging technology and the Department of Transportation's programs.  (Bjorn Dihle/The Juneau Empire via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

ADVANCE FOR THE WEEKEND OF DEC. 12-13 AND THEREAFTER - In this Feb. 14, 2014 photo, snow experts Mike Janes, left, and Ed Shanley assess conditions on Mount Roberts above Juneau, Alaska. The 2015 Southeast Alaska Avalanche Center's Southeast Alaska Snow and Avalanche Workshop featured topics included decision-making, a forecaster's perspective on assessing avalanches, how wind affects snow conditions, emerging technology and the Department of Transportation's programs. (Bjorn Dihle/The Juneau Empire via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

Avalanche workshop aims to give people tools to survive

JUNEAU (AP) — On a Friday night about a dozen years ago, Tom Mattice, then the owner of a snow cat skiing business, told a group of skiers: “It’s really a tragedy that someone will probably die in Washington State tomorrow.”

“Saturday was supposed to be warm and sunny,” recalled Mattice, now the avalanche forecaster for Juneau and director of the Southeast Alaska Avalanche Center, “and the hills would be packed with people who forget that all week long, it was building avalanche conditions.”

The next day, avalanches in Washington buried three people within five miles. Mattice was called to the scene of one of them.

“I said to myself, ‘It’s probably a body search,’” he said.

Mattice joined the search, starting from the bottom of the mountain and moving up.

A short while later, he saw debris in the snow — and then a snowmobile. People are almost always buried uphill of their machine, Mattice said, so he went up and found a glove sticking out of the snow. In that glove was a hand.

“I dug, dug, dug,” he said.

Twenty-two minutes after he got that call, Mattice unearthed the man, whose face shield had protected him and allowed him to breathe.

“Always do the best you can,” Mattice said. “Never give up until you’ve touched skin to skin with that person that’s missing.”

One of the others buried that day was saved by a friend who put his transceiver in his jacket and turned it on when he wasn’t looking. The third caught in an avalanche’s path wasn’t as fortunate.

It’s the goal of Mattice and other organizers of the 2015 Southeast Alaska Avalanche Center’s Southeast Alaska Snow and Avalanche Workshop to avoid situations like the one above — and to make sure that if people are caught in avalanches, those with them have everything they need to maximize their partners’ survival.

“If you have to call 911, odds are good he’s a statistic,” Mattice said.

This year’s workshop featured presentations from International Federation of Mountain Guides Associations mountain and ski guide Colin Zacharias; director of the Chugach National Forest Avalanche Center Wendy Wagner; associate professor of outdoor studies at Alaska Pacific University Eeva Latosuo; snow and avalanche forecaster at the Alaska Department of Transportation Andy Dietrick; retired National Weather Service science officer Carl Dierking; and Kensington Gold Mine snow and avalanche safety director Ron Simenhois.

Topics included decision-making, a forecaster’s perspective on assessing avalanches, how wind affects snow conditions, emerging technology and the Department of Transportation’s programs.

“Every regional workshop is a little different flavor,” DOT’s Dietrick said. “Anybody who is interested in snow and avalanches, outdoor recreation — anybody who’s recreating in avalanche terrain or who’s got an interest in that, will find something in this conference that is interesting.”

The workshop should also interest anyone with a fascination with weather in general, he said, and Juneau has a number of people who could benefit from snow knowledge.

“The last month, we’ve gone up to Eaglecrest, and the parking lot is half full on most days,” he said. “There are so many people that are in town these days … that are interested in recreating in the snow and in the mountains. It’s great to see, for sure.”

It should be educational for both those who have more advanced knowledge of avalanches and those who are more beginners, Mattice said.

“It’s a great community event with lots of fun, and lots of giveaways,” he said.

Eaglecrest, Foggy Mountain, Alaska Powder Descents, Patagonia and other sponsors were set to offer door prizes at the $15 workshop.

“The idea is building safety through education — how we all need to raise the bar and be mentors to those around us, so that we can share that information and become a stronger, safer community,” Mattice said.

Join Chugach National Forest Avalanche Information Center forecasters on Sunday for a 1.5-hour informal avalanche rescue workshop before hitting the hills. The workshop starts at 11 a.m. at the motorized parking lot in Turnagain Pass on the Seward Highway. Look for the blue CNFAIC avalanche trailer.

Practice with your avalanche beacon, learn strategic shoveling techniques and meet local forecasters. Don’t forget to bring your rescue gear: avalanche beacon, shovel, probe. Extras will be available to borrow as well.

This workshop is open to everyone and anyone, novices and experts, that recreate in avalanche terrain — snowmachiners, skiers, kicker-builders. Practicing our rescue skills is a must for all of us. This workshop will be a fun hour that could help save a life in the future.

Find more information and avalanche forecasts at http://www.cnfaic.org.

ADVANCE FOR THE WEEKEND OF DEC. 12-13 AND THEREAFTER - In this April 25, 2014 photo, Mike Janes, avalanche forecaster at Alaska Electric Light and Power, assesses snow conditions above the company's Snettisham hydroelectric facility near Juneau, Alaska. The 2015 Southeast Alaska Avalanche Center's Southeast Alaska Snow and Avalanche Workshop featured topics included decision-making, a forecaster's perspective on assessing avalanches, how wind affects snow conditions, emerging technology and the Department of Transportation's programs.  (Bjorn Dihle/The Juneau Empire via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

ADVANCE FOR THE WEEKEND OF DEC. 12-13 AND THEREAFTER – In this April 25, 2014 photo, Mike Janes, avalanche forecaster at Alaska Electric Light and Power, assesses snow conditions above the company’s Snettisham hydroelectric facility near Juneau, Alaska. The 2015 Southeast Alaska Avalanche Center’s Southeast Alaska Snow and Avalanche Workshop featured topics included decision-making, a forecaster’s perspective on assessing avalanches, how wind affects snow conditions, emerging technology and the Department of Transportation’s programs. (Bjorn Dihle/The Juneau Empire via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

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