In this photo taken on Sunday, Feb. 2, 2014, art handlers Laine Rinehart, left, and Miguel Rohnbacker carry out David and Zach Boxley's carved and painted red cedar chest during the Tináa Art Auction, a fundraiser for the Walter Soboleff Center, at Centennial Hal in Juneau, Alaska. The chest sold for $18,000. The $20 million Soboleff Center will be a Native cultural and educational center run by the Sealaska Heritage Institute.(AP Photo/The Juneau Empire, Michael Penn)

In this photo taken on Sunday, Feb. 2, 2014, art handlers Laine Rinehart, left, and Miguel Rohnbacker carry out David and Zach Boxley's carved and painted red cedar chest during the Tináa Art Auction, a fundraiser for the Walter Soboleff Center, at Centennial Hal in Juneau, Alaska. The chest sold for $18,000. The $20 million Soboleff Center will be a Native cultural and educational center run by the Sealaska Heritage Institute.(AP Photo/The Juneau Empire, Michael Penn)

Art auction draws a crowd

JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — A capacity crowd attended Sealaska Heritage Institute’s first art auction featuring works by northwest Native artists in Juneau, collectively raising more than $300,000 for an educational facility under construction.

The Tinaa Art Auction Saturday night drew a sold-out, black-tie crowd of more than 300, the Juneau Empire (http://is.gd/fx8eUC) reported Monday. The auction title, Tinaa, is a Tlingit word referring to a traditional copper shield representing trade and wealth.

The art auction was a fundraiser for construction of the planned Walter Soboleff Center, named after late Tlingit leader Dr. Walter Soboleff, who died in 2011 at 102. The facility will house a variety of art programs, a retail shop and performance and exhibit spaces.

The weekend auction was held at Centennial Hall and featured 13 live-auction items, 40 silent-auction pieces and a Native fashion show.

The works committed by artists for the auction included weavings, jewelry, paintings and carvings.

Many of the artists attended the event and several took turns at the microphone.

The artists included David Boxley, a Tsimshian carver whose bentwood chest was among the largest items in the live auction. Also in attendance was Haida artist Robert Davidson, who donated a black-and-red painting called “Greatest Echo.”

The runway fashion show was held before the auction and featured northwest coast fashions that included a salmon skin dress made from 35 Kenai River salmon. Also on view was a coat made from sea otter fur.

In organizing the event, institute officials drew on research of the Santa Fe Indian Market, a yearly event held in New Mexico every August since 1922.

At the end of the Juneau event, heritage institute president Rosita Worl said the outpouring of support for the Sobeleff Center was an overwhelmingly positive example of working together for a common goal of creating a regional hub in Juneau for northwest coast art.

“We are going to make this the northwest coast art capital of the world,” Worl said.

Sealaska Heritage Institute is the nonprofit cultural and educational arm of Juneau-based Sealaska Corp., a regional Native corporation.

More in Life

Sierra Ferrell performs on the River Stage at Salmonfest in Ninilchik, Alaska, on Friday, Aug. 4, 2023. (Jake Dye/Peninsula Clarion)
Salmonfest returns Aug. 2-4 for ‘musically infused family reunion’

The three-day event will feature art, festivities and an array of performers

Gold Peak play the opening set of the Seventh Annual Rock’N the Ranch at the Rusty Ravin on Friday, July 7, 2023, at Rusty Ravin Plant Ranch in Kenai, Alaska. (Jake Dye/Peninsula Clarion)
Gold Peak play the opening set of the Seventh Annual Rock’N the Ranch at the Rusty Ravin on Friday, July 7, 2023, at Rusty Ravin Plant Ranch in Kenai. (Jake Dye/Peninsula Clarion)
Music fest returns to RustyRavin

The annual nonprofit music festival is a fundraiser for Nuk’it’un, a transitional home for men

Lisa Parker, vice mayor of Soldotna, celebrates after throwing the ceremonial first pitch before a game between the Peninsula Oilers and the Mat-Su Miners on Tuesday, July 4, 2023, at Coral Seymour Memorial Park in Kenai, Alaska. (Jake Dye/Peninsula Clarion)
King of the River food drive extended, Kenai takes lead

The winning city’s mayor will throw the opening pitch at a Peninsula Oilers game

File
Minister’s Message: The gift of lament

We don’t always know what to do in those difficult parts of life.

Chickpea lentil and spinach curry is served with rice and yogurt. (Photo by Tressa Dale/Peninsula Clarion)
Finding comfort in memories

I believe that houses hold memories, and I hope the memory of our time there comforts it during its final, painful days.

Virginia Walters (Courtesy photo)
Life in the Pedestrian Lane: Good old summertime

The lupines are crazy this year, as were the dandelions.

This advertisement for the Hilltop Bar and Café, the successor to the Circus Bar, appeared in 1962. The names under “Beer and Booze” refer to co-owners Swede Foss and Steve Henry King. (Advertisement contributed by Jim Taylor)
A violent season — Part 5

Bush did not deny killing Jack Griffiths in October 1961, but he claimed to have had no choice in order to protect himself.

tease
Getting creative with camping

Making healthy, diverse meals while outdoors takes some planning

Most Read